Category Archives: Travel Visa

There is no international travel without first obtaining the right travel documents, a valid passport and a travel visa. If you are among the majority, you have to first figure out the visa rules for your country of citizenship and then apply for a destination travel visa. Sometimes, this means planning months in advance and showing some bank balance. Well, we are here to help you so you can focus on planing and not stressing.

International Travel Documentation: Passports, Visas, and Entry Requirements

Travel involves journeying to various geographical regions, each with its own unique landscapes, cultures, and experiences. However, before embarking on such adventures, travelers must secure the necessary documentation, which serves as a gateway to these new territories.

This comprehensive guide delves into the essential components of international travel documentation, with a primary focus on passports, visas, and entry requirements. Understanding these documents is crucial for any traveler, as they not only permit entry into different countries but also ensure compliance with international travel regulations.

This article aims to provide a detailed overview of these key travel documents, offering insights into their purpose, the process of obtaining them, and their role in facilitating smooth and lawful international travel.

Essential Travel Documentation

Ensuing international adventure requires essential travel documents universally recognized for traveling. These mainly include passports and visas. Additionally, individual countries often stipulate specific entry requirements, making them integral to the travel documentation.

Passports

As your primary travel document, a passport is your international identification document. All countries require a valid passport for entry, usually at least six months until expiration.

Passport types vary, including regular, diplomatic, and official passports, each serving a unique purpose. Application processes and costs can differ drastically from country to country, so it is recommended that you check with local government agencies for detailed instructions.

Visas

An endorsement or document from a foreign country allowing entry, departure, or stay for a predetermined amount of time is called a visa. Depending on why you are visiting, there are several types of visas:

  • A tourist visa is for individuals primarily interested in tourism-related activities such as sightseeing, visiting friends and relatives, or experiencing the host country’s culture.
  • Business visas are provided to individuals for business meetings, consultations, conferences, or negotiations.
  • A student visa is issued to students who want to study or engage in research-related activities in the host country.
  • Transit visas are used for short stays while en route to a different country.
  • Work visas are issued to artists, athletes, nurses, or other specially defined work categories.

The visa application process, much like passports, largely varies from country to country. Visa fees are dependent on several factors: the type of visa, how urgently it is required, and the applicant’s nationality. Today, many nations have introduced the idea of “Visa on Arrival” or “E-Visas”, making the visa acquisition process more straightforward and accessible.

Entry Requirements

Countries also impose specific entry requirements in addition to passports and visas. These might involve proof of adequate finances, a return ticket, vaccination certificates (especially in the current pandemic context), and, sometimes, a letter of invitation from a resident of the host country.

Vigilance is necessary here, as these requirements often change based on diplomatic relations and global health environments. Therefore, it’s wise to stay updated about these changes through consular services, travel advisory websites, or global health organizations.

Special Considerations for International Travel

Several factors warrant attention when preparing for international travel to ensure a seamless and rewarding experience. These include:

  • Travel Advisories: Prior knowledge of any existing travel advisories concerning the destination country can significantly impact travel plans. Government websites frequently update such advisories and should be consulted before travel arrangements.
  • Customs Regulations and Import Restrictions: Familiarizing oneself with the destination country’s customs regulations and import restrictions can prevent unnecessary complications. It informs travelers about what they can bring into the country and what might be considered illegal or restricted.
  • Cultural Etiquette and Local Laws: Understanding and respecting local customs, cultural etiquette, and laws in the destination country can contribute to a smoother travel experience and foster mutual respect between visitors and locals.

Incorporating these considerations into travel plans can help ensure that international journeys are smooth and enjoyable.

Common Challenges in Obtaining Travel Documentation

While international travel presents an opportunity for exploration and adventure, navigating the accompanying paperwork can often prove challenging. Several issues can arise during the documentation acquisition process, namely:

  • Processing Delays: The time frame for document processing can greatly differ, leading to potential unexpected hold-ups.
  • Extensive Document Requirements: Travel documents often require a long list of supporting items for due completion and approval.
  • High Costs: Monetary obligations such as application fees associated with passports and visas may add significant costs to the overall travel budget.
  • Navigating Legal Terminology and Processes: The application process often engages intricate legal terminologies and complexities, which may be difficult for individuals unfamiliar with the domain.

Experience has taught seasoned travelers the importance of thorough preparation, patience, and organized documentation. A solid understanding of the legalities involved can significantly streamline this process.

Legal resources such as Lawrina can be of considerable assistance in this sphere. Lawrina can help understand and navigate the complexities of legal constraints and requirements by providing numerous legal document templates and an extensive range of educational guides. This reliable vendor can significantly simplify attaining the required travel documentation, easing the pathway to international travel.

Conclusion

Realizing your dream of exploring the world starts with understanding and acquiring the proper travel documentation, namely, passports and visas, and meeting the specific entry requirements of your dream destination. With a nuanced understanding of these requirements and a touch of patience, globe-trotters can set the stage for an unforgettable, hassle-free international journey.

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How to Apply For US ESTA VISA: The Complete A-to-Z Guide

Note: At this time we strongly recommend against traveling anywhere in the world due to the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic. To fight this pandemic it is important that all of us do our best, so the world can go back to normal with the least amount of human suffering.

That said, and assuming we are over Covid-19 by the end of the summer and your feet are itchy to travel. What should you do? Where should you travel to? What are some of the great deals?

If you are thinking of visiting the USA, how do to apply for a US travel visa or an ESTA? What travel documents would you need The steps and documents required will be determined by your country of citizenship.

Let us explain what is ESTA and how can you apply one.

How to Apply For A USA ESTA VISA

What is ESTA?

The Electronic System for Travel Authorization (also known as ESTA) is an automated system that determines the eligibility of visitors to travel to the United States under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP). It mainly applies to visitors who are coming to the US either by air or sea.

Is ESTA a Guaranteed Entry?

Travel authorization via ESTA does not mean that you are guaranteed entry to the United States. The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers determine admissibility upon travelers’ arrival.

The ESTA application collects biographic information and answers to VWP eligibility questions.

When Should I Apply for ESTA?

It is strongly encouraged that ESTA applications be submitted at least 72 hours prior to your travel. But you can apply as soon as you begin preparing your travel plans. The US CBP’s website says that “In most cases, a response is received within seconds of submitting an application.”

Note: Passengers (including babies) without an ESTA will be denied entry into the US at the port of entry. There is a small fee for applying for ESTA application.

Do I need ESTA to visit US Territories?

Yes, ESTA is also needed for visits to territories such as Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa, Puerto Rico, and U.S. Virgin Islands.

Do I need ESTA if I am traveling from Canada or Mexico by car (land)?

No. ESTA is not needed when arriving by land from Canada or Mexico.

Note: The United States is very strict with its immigration policies and if you are caught entering the country illegally, you will be deported and jailed depending on your crime.

Is My Country Eligible?

As of November 2019, there are 39 countries in the US Visa Waiver Program. Visitors may stay for 90 days in the United States which also includes the time spent in Canada, Mexico, Bermuda, or the Islands in the Caribbean if the arrival was through the United States.

The ESTA is only required if arriving by air or cruise ship. It is not required if arriving overland or on local ferries such as between British Columbia (Vancouver and Victoria) and Washington State.

ESTA Eligible Countries

Listing alphabetically:

  • Andorra
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Brunei
  • Chile
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • South Korea
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Malta
  • Monaco
  • Netherlands
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • San Marino
  • Singapore
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Taiwan
  • United Kingdom

How to Check Your ESTA Status?

You must know your ESTA status before you travel to the US by visiting the ESTA website. First, to know if your country is among the Visa waiver program countries (listed above), and second, to check the status of your application.

In case your country is not on the list of VWP countries, then you must apply for a US Travel visa through a US embassy in your country of residence. Please note applying for a US travel visa is a substantially lengthier process that may require an interview with a U.S. Consular Officer.

ESTA vs. US Travel Visa

At times, some people combine the two documents such as ESTA and US Travel Visa as one; forgetting that they are two different documents. If you are eligible for ESTA, then you must check your ESTA status online.

How Long Is ESTA Valid?

Each travel authorization under ESTA can be valid for up to 2 years. However, a Visa Waiver Program traveler must obtain a new ESTA authorization if they are issued a new passport, or change their name, gender or country of citizenship.

Entry under the Visa Waiver Program is only valid for a combined maximum stay in the US and its surrounding countries of 90 days. The admission period cannot be extended under the ESTA program. If a longer stay is intended, a proper US travel visa is required.

Third-Party ESTA Websites

Some websites offer to complete ESTA applications for a fee, often many times more than the required $14 USD fee charged by the US Government. Access and application through the official U.S. Government website are available to any visitors to the U.S. who qualify under the ESTA program.

Even if one of the third-party websites is used, passengers themselves still have to complete the same form.

Exercise caution though (if using a third party website) as concerns have been raised that third-party sites could be used for identity theft, credit card fraud, or the distribution of malware.

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Visa Free Travel: US Citizens vs. Green Card Holders

Updated: Feb 2020

Are you a US Permanent Resident and someone who loves to travel? If you have been wondering whether to take US Citizenship or not and whether it makes any difference in terms of how many countries you can travel “Visa Free”, then this blog post is for you.

Visa free travel is a big plus when it comes to traveling efficiently. Not having to deal with travel visa saves you money, planning-time, and paperwork. In short, fewer headaches and you can travel on short notice.

Let’s say you are getting a great airline deal or there is a wedding or it’s just that all of your friends are planning a trip, having a US Green Card vs. a US Passport are two totally different things.

Below is the list of countries that lets you enter visa free or provides you a visa on arrival (on the airport) based on your citizen or US permanent residence status.

US Citizens US Green Card
Canada Canada
Mexico Mexico
Guatemala Guatemala
Honduras Honduras
Belize Belize
Nicaragua Nicaragua
Costa Rica Costa Rica
Panama Panama
Bermuda Bermuda
Bahamas Bahamas
Cayman Islands Cayman Islands
Puerto Rico Puerto Rico
American Samoa American Samoa
Guam Guam
Northern Mariana Islands Northern Mariana Islands
U.S. Virgin Islands U.S. Virgin Islands
British Virgin Island British Virgin Island
Dominican Republic Dominican Republic
Haiti Haiti
Jamaica Jamaica
Antigua and Barbuda Antigua and Barbuda
Turks and Caicos Turks and Caicos
Dominica Dominica
Aruba Aruba
Curacao Curacao
Bonaire Bonaire
St. Maarten St. Maarten
St. Eustatius St. Eustatius
Saba Saba
Albania Albania
Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Herzegovina
Georgia Georgia
Serbia Serbia
Montenegro Montenegro
Kosovo Kosovo
Taiwan Taiwan
Antartica Antartica
 
With a US Passport, you can also travel Visa Free to:
Andorra
Anguilla
Antigua & Barbuda
Argentina
Armenia
Austria
Azerbaijan
Bahrain
Bangladesh
Barbados
Belgium
Bolivia
Botswana
Brunei
Bulgaria
Cambodia
Chile
Comoros Islands
Cook Islands
Cote d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast)
Croatia
Cuba
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Djibouti
Dominica
Ecuador
Egypt
Equatorial Guinea
Eritrea
Ethiopia
Faroe Islands
Federated States of Micronesia
Fiji
Finland
France
French Guiana
French Polynesia
Germany
Gibraltar
Greece
Greenland
Grenada
Guyana
Hong Kong
Hungary
Iceland
Indonesia
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Japan
Jordan
Kenya
Kuwait
Kyrgyzstan
Laos
Latvia
Lebanon
Lesotho
Liechtenstein
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Macau
Macedonia
Malawi
Malaysia
Malta
Marshall Islands
Mauritius
Moldova
Monaco
Mongolia
Montserrat
Morocco
Namibia
Nepal
Netherlands
New Caledonia
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Niue
Norway
Oman
Palau
Peru
Philippines
Poland
Portugal
Qatar
Reunion Island
Romania
Rwanda
Samoa
San Marino
Senegal
Seychelles
Singapore
Slovakia
Slovenia
Solomon Islands
South Africa
South Korea
Spain
Sri Lanka
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Swaziland
Sweden
Switzerland
Tanzania
Thailand
Timor Leste
Togo
Tonga
Trinidad & Tobago
Tunisia
Turkey
Tuvalu
Uganda
Ukraine
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom
Uruguay
Vanuatu
Venezuela
Vietnam
Yemen
Zambia
Zimbabwe

Lastly, I must mention that besides your Green Card status, your home country passport will also avail you some visa free travel benefits.

For example, if you are an Indian Citizen and a US Permanent Resident, besides the above-listed countries, you also get to visit over 50 countries based on your passport power.

Common Question

Question: Can I travel to [XYZ destination] with a Green Card only?

Answer: If you are wondering if you can travel to Canada or Mexico with a Green Card only, unfortunately the answer is you will still need your passport if you are traveling by air. If you are driving through, legally you only need your Green Card but it’s a good practice to carry your passport as well.

Related Posts

How to Obtain Argentina Travel Visa for Indian Passport Living in USA

I am an Indian passport holder (with a green card) and live in the USA. What is the process to get an Argentina Travel Visa?

I am answering my own question here based on my experience of getting an Argentina visa from the consulate in Los Angeles.

I am writing this post because I had these questions before I got the visa. The visa experience is from Nov 2014 and might be different depending on when you read this post.

The Argentinian consulate in Los Angeles, CA caters to some 11 states. If you need a visa from them, you have to make an appointment at the consulate. They do not accept walk-ins, nor can you apply by mail.

To make an appointment, send an email to the consulate.

I sent an email to visas_clang@mrecic.gov.ar, but this would be different for other consulates.

The consulate is very busy and hence replies to emails very slowly, sometimes even after 2 weeks. In my case, they replied after a week. Given sufficient time for them to respond and to get an appointment.

A young and old couple doing the Tango

Tips On Communication

When communicating with the consulate, please highlight in the subject that you are requesting for an appointment, and when your date of travel is. This might help you get their attention if you are in a hurry.

The consulate will give you a list of requirements for the visa. They will also give you a date and ask you to confirm it. I took the date they gave me and did not try to change it.

I live in San Francisco, so had to travel to LA for the appointment. On the day of the appointment, I went to the consulate. The consulate is in a good area of Los Angeles and is well connected by public transport. There is parking at the consulate if you decide to drive.

I took public transport. There is a Starbucks if you reach early and need to wait, and printer services outside the consulate, if you need to take any missing printouts. The consulate has restrooms as well.

When you go into the consulate, you need to sign in. they have two lists, one for appointments and one for those without. Sign into the one for appointments. Wait for your name to be called out. You won’t be called before your appointment even if the person handling the visa

is not busy. When your turn comes, a consulate person checks your papers to make sure all required documents are submitted. You are then asked to wait to be interviewed by the consulate officer. I had to wait 20 minutes, but a person before me had to wait for an hour or so.

The consulate officer asked me basic questions as to why i am going there, how long, if i have been there before etc. But he did check to make sure I have all the hotels booked. I had made a list of all the dates and hotels in addition to the hotel reservations. This made him happy.

The officer was very courteous. He approved my visa. I asked him for a multiple entry visa, and he gave me one for twice the number of days I asked for. The passport will be mailed back to me (you have to submit a prepaid USPS priority flat rate envelope) in 7 days. You can ask for 3-day processing for $40.

Pro-Tip: The visa fee is free for Indian passport holders. Therefore, you can ask for a multiple-entry visa, since you don’t have to pay anything extra.

Note: You can carry a backpack to the consulate. So if you are traveling to LA from another city and need to check out from your hotel or just reach there in the morning (by bus or plane), you don’t need to keep your bags in a locker or something. Good luck!

Author Bio

This is a curated post on visa requirements. The author of this article is Ksach and this answer first appeared on a TripAdvisor forum. Some changes are made to make this article more useful.

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How to Overcome Travel Visa Hassles as an Indian

If you are someone who holds an Indian passport and wants to travel the world – backpacking, cruising, or simply wanting to fly and explore a new country, you likely already know the frustrating drill.

As an Indian passport holder, you rank 67th in the world and it is true that the situations for Indians are improving. For example, India used to be ranked #77 just five years ago (in 2015).

With significant improvements made on the diplomatic front with several foreign countries, as of 2019, as an Indian citizen, you get to travel visa-free to 25 countries and get visa on arrival to an additional 39 countries.

Must Read: List of Countries Indians Can Travel Visa-Free on a US H1/F1 Visa

This is all great and all Indians should celebrate! But, like me, someone with an Indian passport, you still need a pre-approved travel visa to a whopping 134 countries.

This makes travel expensive, time-consuming, stressful, and overall less fun!

Fun Fact: The UAE passport is currently ranked number 1, which allows a UAE citizen visa-free travel to 167 countries. Other countries in the top 5 are Canada, United States, Germany, FranceDenmark, Sweden, Luxembourg, Finland, Italy, Singapore, Netherlands, Spain, Norway, and South Korea.

Overcome Travel Visa Hassles as an Indian

The Taj Mahal, India

Whatever! This all said one should not feel discouraged. As the old saying goes, where there is a will, there is a way. Moreover, there are hundreds of Indians (if not thousands) who have managed to travel all over the world on a budget and average passport power.

As Indians, your biggest advantage is your language skills. If you are reading this blog in English, you will have no problem exploring this planet from Antarctica to the Arctic Circle.

Must Read: The Ultimate India Travel Guide

Here are my few recommendations for Indian backpackers and world travelers:

Start at Home

Travel and explore everything in the country you reside and India. If you live in India, then make sure you have traveled to all 29 Indian States.

If you live in the United States, make sure you have traveled to all 50 US States. The same applies for whether you work and live in the Middle East or Canada or the UK or Australia for that matter.

Visit the Neighbors

The Himalayas in Nepal

As per the India-Nepal and India-Bhutan treaty, Indians enjoy no questions asked, visa-free travel to both Nepal and Bhutan. You can even work there or teach English or do some volunteering work and take your time while you explore these beautiful Himalayan countries.

Tiger’s Nest Monastery in Bhutan

Travel to Visa Free Countries

Once you have covered your home and residence country, start with the countries that welcome you.  It’s time to return the favor through our travel and the money that we spend in a foreign country.

Tourism is the bread and butter of many countries and many of these countries depend on our tourism revenue. For example, Maldives, Madagascar, and Mauritius, to name a few.

Here is the list of countries that allows Indians to arrive visa-free:

Widi Islands Lagoon, Indonesia

Explore Visa on Arrival Countries

Wild Sri Lanka

Apply for Schengen Visa for Europe

If you want to travel to Europe (and you should), the best way to go about it is to apply for a multi-year, multiple entry Schengen Visa. Currently, the Schengen Area consists of 26 member European countries.

Northern Lights in Vik, Iceland

This allows you to travel to all of these countries which are all located in Europe.

Well, if you travel to all the countries listed above, you would easily become one of the most traveled people in the world.

You see, the challenge is not the lack of information or the Indian passport, but of proper planning.

WW2 Brandenburg Gate in Germany

 

Read Next: List of Countries Indians Can Travel Visa-Free on a US H1/F1 Visa

If you have enough motivation, you will make it happen! Go travel the world and explore everything under the sun.

If you have any questions, please leave it in the comments below.

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Getting a Caribbean Second Passport: Whys and Hows

When it comes to travel, leisure, or business opportunities, few places rival that of the Caribbean. Caribbean countries typically top the leader board as a preferred vacation destination.

But, did you know beyond being a robust tourism market, the Caribbean also boasts strong business opportunities? And that you can apply and have a dual citizenship here?

Photo: Caribbean life / The Art of Travel Partners

In today’s world, a second passport is beneficial. Not only does it open doors, but it also gives you options for how you travel and conduct business. Having second citizenship in the Caribbean is an insurance policy, providing security for your assets and your future.

A second citizenship has become an increasingly popular way to enjoy the ease of travel and operating a profitable lifestyle or online business. 

Today, we’ll discuss the whys and hows of getting a Caribbean second passport as a wise lifestyle and financial move. But first of all, let’s begin with the basics.

What is dual citizenship?

For most, the concept of dual citizenship may seem foreign. By definition, dual citizenship, sometimes called dual nationality, means being a legal citizen of two countries.

In some situations, this can happen automatically, for example, when children are born in a specific country to foreign parents.

In this instance, dual citizenship is achieved through a specialized legal process. This includes obtaining a second passport in the Commonwealth countries of the Caribbean through a Citizenship by Investment Program.

For affluent travelers, Citizen by Investment programs can also provide access to a secure line of protection to safeguard your family’s private wealth.

Benefits of a Caribbean second passport

Obtaining a second citizenship provides numerous benefits. Besides receiving a passport from both countries, being a dual citizen includes benefits and privileges such as:

  • Visa-free travel
  • Lifestyle in a tropical paradise
  • Investment opportunities
  • Business opportunities
  • Wealth preservation
  • Access to the finest offshore schools
  • Access to either country’s social services

How to Get a Caribbean Second Passport

Dual citizens are also afforded the ability to work in both countries without a permit or visa and vote in either one.

A second passport can give you and your family certain economic and educational advantages in addition to mobility benefits that make the Caribbean one of the most advantageous second citizenship destinations.

Obtaining a second passport

The traditional journey to acquiring a second passport can be long and arduous.

Not only can it take many years, but it can also be very expensive, with years of physical residency required. The costs of obtaining a second passport will vary, but often include legal and professional fees and government fees.

Dual citizenship through naturalization

The conventional route to obtaining a second passport is done through naturalization. Most countries will provide a means to acquire dual citizenship by applying for residency.

Applicants must then spend a certain amount of time, usually many years, in the country they apply to.

While this is the ideal option for many, eligibility through naturalization will vary significantly by each country. Residency options may change frequently as they are subject to the laws of supply and demand.

Countries facing an economic recession or that have increased demand may have a much greater barrier to entry. This application process is often intensive, expensive, and time-consuming.

Citizenship by Investment

In the Caribbean, legislation exists to make it easier to obtain dual citizenship.

Citizenship by Investment programs are the fastest option for obtaining a second passport. For qualified applicants, dual citizenship can be granted in as little as 90 days, with little or no residency required.

Affluent individuals applying for a second passport through an economic citizenship program can do so via specific investments. An individual would be required to meet a particular set of criteria, as well as different degrees of residency and investment.

There are different available channels for applying for Citizenship by Investment; this can be done by investing in a luxury property, making a donation to the government, and in some jurisdictions, investing in a business.

In return, applicants are provided immediate and tangible rewards and financial and personal security.

The value/benefit ratio of the Caribbean passports is one of the best in the world: relatively low cost and low processing time, little or no residency, and excellent travel and tax structuring benefits, versus years of residency and high cost for the U.S., Canada, and European programs.

Related: World Travel Planner

Why become a Caribbean Citizen?

As a dream vacation destination for many, the Caribbean has always been a paradise and region for international culture. With uncertainty in the current geopolitical climate, obtaining a second passport might just be the best investment you and your family could make.

Author Bio

Kaline Kennard is the co-founder of Citizens International, a white-glove specialist firm offering private client services necessary for citizenship investment into the Caribbean. Based in the Caribbean for the past 15 years, she is an experienced consultant who works directly with many professional partners and advises clients worldwide.

Top 5 Tips For Moving Abroad

Moving abroad is most definitely an exciting time in your life. However, it can also cause an enormous amount of stress. There will be loose ends to tie up, deadlines to meet, and of course, you’ll have to ship over some of your valuable possessions to your new location.

You’ll need to ensure that relocating suits your lifestyle and of course, you’ll need to do whatever it takes to fit into your new surroundings. All of this can be difficult, especially when you’re looking to live and earn money in your new country.

To help you get through this tricky, yet exciting period, we’ve come up with an essential guide, just for you! 

Make Prior Visits 

It may seem like the most obvious point. However, you should always try to arrange a visit to the country before you actually make a move there. It’s easy to get caught up in the whirlwind of taking the leap and moving to a country which seems appealing. Without visiting the place itself, how do you truly know what it’s like to live there?

By visiting the country for a short period beforehand, you’ll get an opportunity to experience the country and get familiar with your surroundings and discover whether you feel at home and still have the same level of excitement at the prospect of moving.

This can ultimately help you feel at home once you’re there. Visiting can also help you decide between two different locations if you must choose.

Do Your Research

Research is something that should be thoroughly conducted before your move. It shouldn’t be just for activities or careers in that country, but you should do some extensive research to see if there are any legal requirements before you move.

For example, in Britain, before you move and in certain circumstances, you’ll need to apply for a UK visa. In fact, in today’s global political climate, you’ll most likely need a visa for anywhere you may want to go. Do your homework.

The visa application process is not as simple as it may look online. For most countries, there will be a significant wait time. Use the internet to research as much as possible, as you’ll need to be aware of everything legally before your move.

Language

We understand that learning a whole new language can be extremely difficult. However, when you are living in a country, it is imperative that you have an understanding of its language.

Getting an initial grasp of the language will help you pick up the basics and any phrases which are important to know. This, in turn, will help you fit in, feel a lot more comfortable and also ensure that you’re confident in your new surroundings.

Friends & Family 

When it comes to moving abroad, it would certainly be much more ideal if you could move to the country with your close friends or family. However, this is rarely a possibility. Have a look at your friend’s list and see if there are any friends or family in that country that can help you adjust to your new location.

Your friends or family can be very helpful if you end up feeling slightly homesick. Having a support network of family and friends will give you a taste of what it was like to be at home, should you start missing the culture, foods or general ways you used to live.

Relax 

As there is so much to do, it can feel impossible to relax. However, you’ll need to ensure you do. Take a break from the forms and just relax and explore. Instead of worrying about how you will fit in, try thinking about how you will be able to experience new things and be able to find out new things about yourself.

Make your preparations as clear as possible and have a clear mind about what your goals and aspirations are for the next step of your life. Don’t rush and just ensure that you have everything covered for the next steps in your exciting journey.

Autor’s Bio

Roman Winter is an aspiring freelance writer with a passion for finance, legal, and travel. With a large backlog of articles, he has written for several different types of publications. @RomanWinter5

www.artoftravel.store/

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Visa Free Travel for US Citizens: Countries You Can Visit Without Visa

Last updated: Feb 2020

Don’t you like Visa free travel? I sure love that. Visa free is hassle free; plus money and time saving. Citizens of the United States of America can visit almost 160 countries and territories with just a valid US passport.

Note: Some of these countries listed below do require a visa, but it can be issued upon arrival. If you have a US Green Card (Permanent Residency card), please check this Visa free travel list for US Green Card holders.

Visa Free Travel for US Citizens

Here is the updated list of countries, which you can visit without a visa or by obtaining a visa on arrival.

Listing alphabetically:

  • Albania – You will have to pay an entry tax fee (which is not a lot. Last time it was 10 euros). The maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Andorra – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days. You can enter from Spain or France.
  • Anguilla – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Antigua & Barbuda – Maximum duration of stay is 1 month.
  • Argentina – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days. You need to pay the reciprocity fee of $160 (good for 10 years) before the trip.
  • Antarctica – No particular country claims the continent of Antarctica, therefore no visa is required and no maximum duration of stay is noted.
  • Armenia – You can achieve visa on arrival, but only at Zvartnots Airport in Yerevan. The fee is $30 USD. The maximum duration of stay is 21 days.
  • Aruba Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Austria Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Azerbaijan – Visa can be obtained on arrival. The fee is $40, and they require a passport photo. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Bahamas – Maximum duration of stay is 8 months.
  • Bahrain – Visa can be obtained on arrival for BHD 5. The maximum duration of stay is 14 days.
  • Bangladesh – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Barbados – Maximum duration of stay is 180 days.
  • Belgium – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.    
  • Belize – Maximum duration of stay is 1 month.
  • Bermuda – Maximum duration of stay is 6 months.
  • Bolivia – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.      
  • Bosnia & Herzegovina – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Botswana – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • British Virgin Islands – Maximum duration of stay 30 days.
  • Brunei – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Bulgaria – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Cambodia – Visa can be obtained on arrival. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Canada – Maximum duration of stay is 6 months.
  • Cayman Islands – Maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Chile – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Colombia – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Comoros Islands – Visa obtained on arrival.  
  • Costa Rica – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Cook Islands – Maximum duration of stay is 31 days.
  • Cote d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Croatia – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Cuba – A tourist card must be purchased at airline company or travel agency for $25 before the trip.
  • Cyprus – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days. You won’t be allowed to enter the country if you have been to self-declared Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus and have a stamp in your passport acknowledging this fact.
  • Czech Republic – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Denmark – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Djibouti – Visa is obtained on arrival. The fee depends on the length of stay. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Dominica – Maximum duration of stay is 6 months.
  • Dominican Republic – The tourist card is issued, instead of visa. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Ecuador – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.    
  • Egypt – Visa obtained on arrival for $15. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • El Salvador – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Equatorial Guinea – No maximum duration of stay noted.
  • Eritrea – Visa obtained upon arrival. The fee depends on the length of stay. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.    
  • Ethiopia – Visa obtained on arrival. The maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Faroe Islands – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Federated States of Micronesia – Maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Fiji – Maximum duration of stay is 4 months.
  • Finland – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • France – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • French Guiana – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • French Polynesia – Maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Georgia – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Germany – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Gibraltar – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Greece – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Greenland – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Grenada – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Guam – The territory of the United States.
  • Guatemala – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Guyana – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Haiti – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Honduras – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Hong Kong – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Hungary – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Iceland – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Indonesia – Visa obtained on arrival for $25. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Ireland – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Israel – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Italy – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Jamaica – Maximum duration of stay is 180 days.
  • Japan – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Jordan – Visa obtained on arrival. The maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Kenya – eVisa can be obtained online or upon arrival for $52 USD. The maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Kosovo – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Kuwait – Visa obtained on arrival for KWD 5. The maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Kyrgyzstan – Maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Laos – Visa obtained on arrival. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Latvia – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Lebanon – Visa obtained on arrival for free if the duration of stay is 1 month or less.
  • Lesotho – Maximum duration of stay is 14 days.
  • Liechtenstein – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Lithuania – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Luxembourg – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Macau – Maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Macedonia – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Malawi – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Malaysia – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Malta – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Mariana Islands – The territory of the United States of America.
  • Marshall Islands – No maximum duration of stay noted.
  • Mauritius – Maximum duration of stay is 180 days.
  • Mexico – Maximum duration of stay is 180 days.
  • Moldova – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Monaco – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Mongolia – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Montenegro – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Montserrat – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Morocco – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Namibia – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Nepal – Visa obtained on arrival. The fee ($25-40) depends on the length of stay. The maximum duration of stay is 150 days.
  • Netherlands – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • New Caledonia – Maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • New Zealand – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Nicaragua – Visa obtained upon arrival for $10. The maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Niue – Maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Norway – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Oman – Visa obtained on arrival. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Palau – Maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Panama – Maximum duration of stay is 180 days.
  • Peru – Maximum duration of stay is 183 days.
  • Philippines – Maximum duration of stay is 21 days.
  • Poland – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Portugal – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Qatar – Visa obtained on arrival. The maximum duration of stay is 21 days.
  • Reunion Island – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Romania – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Rwanda – Visa obtained upon arrival for free. The maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Samoa (Western part) – A visitor permit must be obtained upon arrival, instead of a visa. The maximum duration of stay is 60 days.
  • American  Samoa – It’s a territory of the United States so obviously no Visa required.
  • San Marino – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Senegal – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Serbia – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Seychelles – Maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Singapore – Maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Slovakia – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Slovenia – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Solomon Islands – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • South Africa – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • South Korea – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Spain – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Sri Lanka – Visa obtained upon arrival. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Saint Lucia – Maximum duration of stay is 180 days.
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines – Maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Swaziland – Maximum duration of stay is 60 days.
  • Sweden – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Switzerland – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.       
  • Taiwan – Visa is not required if you arrive at Taipei Chiang Kai Shek or Kaohsiung Airport. The maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Tanzania – Visa obtained on arrival
  • Thailand – Visa obtained on arrival. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Timor Leste (East Timor) – Visa obtained on arrival. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Togo – Visa obtained upon arrival. The maximum duration of stay is 7 days.
  • Tonga – Visa obtained upon arrival for free. The maximum duration of stay is 31 days.      
  • Trinidad & Tobago – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Tunisia – Maximum duration of stay is 120 days.
  • Turkey – Visa obtained on arrival for $20. The maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Turks and Caicos Islands – Maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Tuvalu – Visa obtained on arrival. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Uganda – Visa obtained upon arrival. The fee depends on the length of the stay.
  • Ukraine – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • United Arab Emirates – Visa obtained upon arrival. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • United Kingdom – Maximum duration of stay is 6 months.
  • Uruguay – Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • U. S. Virgin Islands – The territory of the United States.
  • Vanuatu – Maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Venezuela Maximum duration of stay is 90 days.
  • Vietnam – Visa obtained on arrival. You need a “pre-approval” from an Embassy application.
  • Yemen – Visa obtained upon arrival. The maximum duration of stay is 30 days.
  • Zambia – Visa obtained on arrival. The fee depends on the length of stay.
  • Zimbabwe – Visa obtained upon arrival. The fee depends on the length of stay. The maximum duration of stay is 90 days.

Read More

What are Your Biggest Travel Problems and Questions?

This is a special and unique post that we will be a LIVE thread for answering your biggest travel problems and questions. Please comment your travel related questions here and we’ll answer them in the comments below.

That said, we have compiled a list of most commonly asked travel questions (around travel visa, safety, hacks and tips, miles, etc.). Please read our massive Travel FAQ page for answers to many of your Common Travel Questions.

Your Biggest Travel Problems & Questions

The Art of Travel is a community for hardcore travelers. We are a group of everyday folks who love to travel and experience the freedom that comes from traveling. However, travel (Internation Travel in particular) is a time and money consuming luxury that most of us can’t afford.

Sure we talk about and share our tips on Saving Money for Travel and Budget Travel but when you have three kids and a minimum wage job, none of the travel hacks quite work for everyone. It gets tricky.

If you have money but less time, we have plenty of travel hacks for you.

If you have plenty of time and little money, well, congratulations, we have you covered as well.

But what to do when you so desperately want to travel but don’t have either money or time. You work very hard to provide for yourself or your family and after paying all the bills and debts, you are left with pretty much nothing except some gas money for carpooling with your friends on a highly crowded weekend.

We want to address these and similar questions and would like to hear from you. What do you struggle with most when it comes to travel? What questions do you need to be answered? What are your biggest travel problems and questions?

Comment below and I will address each one of them in separate blog posts. I’ll do my best to be as thorough and detailed as possible.

We want to know you and we want to help you!

Tell us your travel problems

You can also contact us on Facebook or tweet to us. You can leave a comment on our YouTube videos or on our Instagram posts. If you wish, you can email us as well. If you want to send us mail us, our address is:

Art of Travel, Inc

30 French St. #22

Quincy, Massachusetts USA 02171

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2697 Days: A Personal Story of Becoming a US Citizen

I am going to America, I muttered to my family of five while having dinner at our rented home during a hot Delhi summer of 2008. All of a sudden, a deep silence, screaming fear, frustration, and failure yelled  back at me through those eyes.

Those were the eyes of my dad, mom, brother, and sister. I still remember those eyes. There were no questions from any of us because we all knew the answer. It was not possible considering our financial situation.

The Struggles

We were already under heavy debt as my dad lost his business. We were barely making month to month. So, I decided to remain quiet that night! But in my heart, I knew that I am going to America – the land of freedom and dream chasing!

The next morning while I was getting ready to go to college, my mother pulled me to a corner in our kitchen so nobody could hear us. She told me that she is on my team and she has some jewelry and she could sell them.

Selling my mom’s jewelry? No way, but it seemed at the time that, that was our only option. The money from her jewelry would be sufficient for my one-way flight ticket and a couple of months of survival cost in America.

Here I was, a young 20 years old, a naive stupid boy who has watched “The Pursuit of Happyness” a million times and thought he can pull it all by himself. Guess what, I somewhat did pull it.

The Path

I would attend college during the day and do a call center gig at night. I used public transportation, drank 2c street-side water, ate 40c meals, and used to stay in cheap lodging. I even stayed with a group of Chinese Christian missionaries in a church guesthouse in Gurgaon.

I was able to save money to buy a one-way flight ticket. With hard work comes luck. I found a university that would transfer my college credits to US Universities and gave me 50% tuition scholarship if I kept up my GPA above 3.0. North Dakota State University (NDSU), Fargo accepted me.

It was one of the coldest places in the country. NDSU was offering me all the goodies, financial aid and 6 months of snow. I said, “I’ll take it. I’ll adapt, survive, and thrive.” By the summer of 2008, I was all set to attend NDSU beginning Spring 2009 session.

I have managed to save enough money for a one-way flight ticket, visa expenses, and to survive the first couple of months. I landed my feet in New York, America on Jan 4, 2009.

Persistence

For next 3.5 years, I took various odd jobs to survive such as cleaning job/ushering, donating blood plasma for a minimum wage, selling soaps door to door (thanks to Amway), and sharing a 3 bedroom apartment between 5 students (with a stunning rent of $108pp).  

My college sweetheart broke off, I graduated in spring 2012 with $17,000 in debt (Failure #1092), I was killing it. Not soon after, my college sweetheart broke off with me. I went through and understood what “depression” really means. I happily graduated in spring 2012 with $17,000 in debt and 1092 failures behind me. You can see, I was killing it.

Two months post-graduation, I got a contracting job with Dell Services. To save money to pay off my debts, I chose to sleep on the carpet in a shared unfurnished apt with a whopping rent of $206 pp. I waited on buying a car and instead took 2 hours long train to commute. I was able to pay off the bulk of my debts in 6 months. That was my trade-off, savings over self-sacrifice.

The end result, I was relaxed and at peace. I saved quite a lot, switched my gigs and moved out to Orange County, California. I soon bought a brand new luxury car, rented a beach condo, and I was on top of the dating scene. This time, I was really nailing it until I got a phone call from home at 4:30 am. 

My mother was crying on the other side that Dad is on a ventilator from the past 9 days and has got a poor outlook on survival. She didn’t ask me to come back because she knew that my visa won’t allow me to travel to India and return back to the U.S.

I had just turned 25 the day before, but after that phone call, I suddenly felt like a 40 years old man surrounded in a bubble of stress. All kinds of stress. What happened? Where did it all go wrong? I was frustrated, scared, sad, and numb.

My decision was clear and I wanted to stay in the US and add value to society. I knew I want to do something with my life. I knew I want to live in a free land. So I exercised the law of attraction. I took immediate action, whatever I could do. I spoke to multiple doctors for the best treatment for my dad. I remained positive and calm.

Fourteen days later, my dad made it back to life and arrived home with a smile. However, during this time I lost my job and was back to square one. I had exhausted my savings. I was back to square “none”.

Luckily, the unique skills set that I have developed in the healthcare industry, it wasn’t hard for me to find a new job. I found a new contract within 6 weeks and took the first flight to North Carolina when I heard back about my job offer.

I started all over again but this time besides my 9 to 5, I had a side gig too for some passive and side income. You see, in this economy, it is not wise to put all your eggs in the “job basket.” Would you? If you have no savings?

In December 2014, I visited India after 5 years. When I returned after almost half a decade, so much has changed. I bought a new house for my parents, returned jewelry to my mother, and just enjoyed family time.

My younger sister has grown so much. Wow, it has been 5 years. With that visit, I also knew that it will be a long time since I’ll see them again, thanks to the system, BS. But when the time came to return, I also knew that it will be again a long time before I’ll see my family, thanks to the broken immigration system.

It takes over 10-15 years for regular people from India to immigrate to the U.S. And during this long wait time, people often don’t see their family for years. This is BS. In October 2015, I decided to quit my well-paying job to join US Army Reserves.

I had the following in my mind:

  • I’ll have a chance to become a US Citizen.
  • I want to give back to the country that has served my dreams.
  • I was craving to succeed and achieve a milestone after a million failures.
  • I know that Army training can push me harder and make me a better leader.
  • Good can go bad but only greatness leads to greatness. Being good was not good enough.
  • I have a strong desire to inspire and give hopes to the underdogs, scared and lonely people out there.

And this was the perfect platform. I love America! Indeed, the USA is a land of opportunities. Anyone can make it here if they are willing to work hard and sacrifice. I have made my dreams come true. A new set of dreams and goals have now evolved for me. It was a relentless pursuit, be it good or bad.

I am grateful for every single event which has contributed to nurturing the seeds of past actions to successful fruition.

So come and join me to celebrate a day of triumph over the failures, the success that comes from the hardship, hope to a better future and a shout out to the land of the free and home of the brave.

Now I can visit back home (to India) every year just to celebrate festivals, eat my mom’s food, take care of my father, and to sleep in my childhood bed. May 24th, 2016, I was naturalized through the US Army Reserves.

I am a US Citizen now. And, I am ready to continue my journey to greatness.

Guest Post by Mukul Jain. Edited by The Art of Travel for clarity. All rights reserved.

Related Posts

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Nepali Citizen On H1B Visa: Countries You Can Visit Without Needing A Visa

Last updated: Jan 2020

Here is the ultimate checklist for Visa-free travel for Nepali citizens on H1 or F1 or B1 visa and living in the United States.

There are several countries that would allow a Nepal citizen to enter their borders with a valid US single or any multiple-entry visa for tourism purposes for up to 6 months.

Are you happy? Let’s take a look at this list of countries.

Jaipur, India

H1B VISA FREE Travel for Nepali Citizen

  • Mexico (Visa not required for any valid USA visa holders to enter Mexico with tourist, transit & business purposes)
  • South Korea (30 days visa free entry for people holding valid visa for Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand or the USA)
  • Serbia (90 days visa free entry for valid visa holders or residents of the European Union member states and the USA)
  • Georgia (90 days visa-free entry for Nepalese citizens who are holders of valid visa or residence permit issued by USA, UK, Japan, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Israel, South Korea, Schengen and GCC countries)
  • American Samoa (Citizens of Nepal living in the United States can travel to American Samoa using their valid United States visa)

Cancun, Mexico

Note: As of January 2020, Nepalese citizens had visa-free or visa on arrival access to 37 countries and territories, ranking the Nepalese passport 98th in the world according to the Visa Restrictions Index.

  • India (Nepalese citizens may live and work freely in Nepal under the terms of the 1950 Indo-Nepal Treaty of Peace and Friendship.) Read more: 1950 Indo-Nepal Treaty of Peace and Friendship
  • Mauritius (Visa not required, maximum 90 days)
  • Micronesia (Visa not required, maximum 30 days)
  • Pakistan (Visa not required, maximum 30 days)
  • Philippines (Visa not required, maximum 30 days)
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (Visa not required, maximum 30 days)
  • Singapore (Visa not required, maximum 30 days)
  • Dominica (Visa not required, maximum 21 days)
  • Gambia (Visa not required, maximum 90 days)
  • Haiti (Visa not required, maximum 3 months)
  • Samoa (Entry Permit on arrival, maximum 60 days)
  • Seychelles (Visitor’s Permit on arrival, maximum 1 month)
  • Madagascar (Visa on arrival, maximum 90 days)
  • Malawi (Visa on arrival. Generally 30-90 days)
  • Maldives (Visa on arrival, maximum 30 days)
  • Mauritania (Visa on arrival. Generally 30-90 days)
  • Palau (Visa on arrival, maximum 30 days)
  • Tanzania (Visa on arrival, maximum 3 months)
  • Timor-Leste (Visa on arrival, maximum 30 days)
  • Togo (Visa on arrival, maximum 7 days)
  • Tuvalu (Visa on arrival, maximum 30 days)
  • Uganda (Visa on arrival. Generally 30-90 days)
  • Bolivia (Visa on arrival, maximum 90 days)
  • Cambodia (Visa on arrival, maximum 30 days)
  • Cape Verde (Visa on arrival. Generally 30-90 days)
  • Comoros (Visa on arrival. Generally 30-90 days)
  • Djibouti (Visa on arrival. Generally 30-90 days)
  • Guinea-Bissau (Visa on arrival, maximum 90 days)
  • Iran (Visa on arrival, maximum 30 days)
  • Laos (Visa on arrival, maximum 30 days)

e-Visa and Special Permits

Sunset in Sri Lanka

  • Sri Lanka (Electronic Travel Authorization [ETA] for 30 days can be obtained online. Must hold return or onward ticket.)
  • Myanmar (An eVisa for 28 days can be obtained online. eVisa holders must arrive via Yangon, Nay Pyi Taw or Mandalay airports.)
  • Georgia (eVisa can be applied online)
  • Kenya (eVisa can be obtained for 3 months)
  • Somalia (Visa on arrival for 30 days, provided an invitation letter issued by the sponsor has been submitted to the Airport Immigration Department at least 2 days before arrival)
  • Vietnam (Prearranged visa obtained online through travel agencies available at Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City, Phu Quoc or Da Nang airports. Up to 30 days.)
  • Egypt (Conditional visa on arrival can be obtained but not a guarantee)
  • Australia (Visa can be applied and obtained online)
  • Rwanda (Visa can be applied and obtained online)
  • São Tomé and Príncipe (Visa can be applied and obtained online)

As many of you have messaged me or commented that how can you keep track of the changes in future visa status? Well, here is the easy answer. You can bookmark this website. VisaHQ

Just type in your citizenship, where you currently live and where you would want to visit.

Online Application, Visas Requirements

Usually, things do not change for years or decades. And when they do, they are often “very good” or “very bad”. In other words, either your country has made new agreements with another country or a country has severed its ties or changed its visa rules and/or relationships with your country.

Lastly, yes, any valid multiple-entry visa (such as H, B, F, etc) will be qualified.

Note: Always double check the destination country’s immigration website before booking any flights or trips. As many of you have rightly said, things can change and you don’t want to be caught off-guard.

Related: Indian Citizen On H1B Visa in USA: Countries You Can Visit Without Needing A Visa

Happy travels!

 

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US Green Card Holder: Countries You Can Visit Without Needing A Visa

Updated: Feb 2020

U.S. Green Card Holders (aka Permanent Residents of the United States of America) can travel to 23 sovereign countries and several dependencies without needing a Travel Visa. This is true regardless of your country of citizenship.

As long as you are a US Green Card holder, there are many countries and dependencies that you can visit just like an American citizen with an American passport.

Green Card Visa Free Travel

Photo: A sample green card from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

The Reality is that your permanent residency status in the USA doesn’t influence your need for Visas, while your actual citizenship does. So your passport issuing country is more critical to your international traveling abilities.

If you stay in the US as a Permanent Resident, popularly known as the Green Card holder, your ability to travel to other countries without a Visa depends on which country issued your passport.

For the majority of countries (not listed below), you will need to check individually whether they require a Visa from the citizens of your passport-issuing country.

Visa Free Countries for Green Card Holder

Here is a list of countries that will let you in without a Travel Visa, regardless of your citizenship, provided that you are US Permanent Resident (i.e. Green Card Holder).

Listing Alphabetically

  • Albania: Visa free travel up to 90 days with a valid passport and US Green Card.
  • Antigua and Barbuda: Visa free travel up to 30 days with a valid passport (6 months validity) and US Green Card.
  • Bahamas: Passport and green card are necessary when traveling to the Bahamas.
  • Barbados: Visa free travel (30-90 days depending on your passport issuing country). Cruise ship passengers (from any country) arriving and departing do not need a visa. More information here.
  • Belize: Passport must be valid for at least six months past the end date of stay. With prior approval from Belizean immigration, green card holders receive a Visa upon arrival. The fee is $50 USD.
  • Bermuda: A green card is enough when traveling to Bermuda via cruise. Passport and green card are both necessary if flying into Bermuda.
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina: Visa free travel up to 90 days with a valid passport (6 months validity) and US Green Card.
  • British Virgin Islands: Passport, proof of accommodations on the island, and proof of return journey, and your US Green Card is required for the entry. You do not need any travel visa.
  • Canada: Under the “good neighbor policy,” regardless of your country of citizenship, green card holders are allowed to enter Canada without a Visa. When traveling by land or sea directly from the U.S., you will only need to provide proof of your U.S. lawful permanent resident status (such as your Green Card). However, if flying or transiting thorough Canada, you will need to present both a) Green Card, and b) Valid Passport
  • Cayman Islands: Green card holders can stay in the Cayman Islands for up to 30 days without having a Tourist Visa.
  • Costa Rica: Passport & Green Card must be valid for at least six months from the date of entry into the country. (Exception: If you have a refugee status you will need to apply for a restricted visa, a process which may take some time. Read more here.)
  • Dominica: Visa free travel up to 6 months with a valid passport (6 months validity) and US Green Card.
  • Dominican Republic: Passport, green card, and tourist card required. (Note: Anyone who can legally travel or reside in the U.S. does not need a Visa to travel to the Dominican Republic for tourist purposes.)
  • Guatemala: Carry your passport (with 6 months of validity) and Green Card. Up to 90 days of visa free stay.
  • Haiti: You need your Green Card and Passport with at least 6 months of validity. All foreign passport holders traveling to Haiti must pay a tourist fee set at $10.00 at the airport. (Exception: Unfortunately, this Visa waiver does not apply to Green Card holders who are citizens of Syria, Libya, Iran, Vietnam, Yemen, Chechnya.)
  • Honduras:  Carry your passport (with 6 months of validity) and Green Card. Up to 90 days of visa free stay.
  • Jamaica: Passport, green card, and round-trip tickets to the U.S. or onward tickets to another destination required. (Exception: Unfortunately, this waiver does not apply to Green Card holders who are citizens of Taiwan.)
  • Kosovo: Visa free travel up to 15 days with a valid passport (6 months validity) and US Green Card.
  • Mexico: Under the “good neighbor policy,” regardless of your country of citizenship, green card holders are allowed to enter Mexico without a Visa. You must carry a valid passport and your U.S. Permanent Resident/Green Card at all times.
  • Montenegro: Visa free travel up to 30 days with a valid passport (6 months validity) and US Green Card.
  • Nicaragua:  Carry your passport (with 6 months of validity) and Green Card.
  • Panama:  Carry your passport (with 6 months of validity) and Green Card. Up to 90 days of visa free stay.
  • Serbia: Visa free travel up to 90 days with a valid passport (6 months validity) and US Green Card.
  • South Korea: Visa free travel for 30 days for US Permanent Resident. You can transit through and stay in South Korea for 30 days, but South Korea must NOT be your final destination.
  • Taiwan: Visa free travel up to 30 days with a valid passport (6 months validity) and US Green Card.
  • Turks and Caicos Islands: Visa free travel up to 30 days with a valid passport (6 months validity) and US Green Card.
  • U.S. Virgin Islands: (Not a sovereign country but a US territory). Anyone traveling between the U.S. and its territories (including US Virgin Islands) is not required to show a passport or green card for entry. This is because they are essentially on home soil. The same applies to Puerto Rico, American SamoaGuam, and the Northern Mariana Islands.

Visa Free Caribbean Netherlands

  • Aruba: Passport must be valid for at least six months from the date of entry, and a green card is necessary. No need for a Visa to enter.
  • Curacao: Passport must be valid for at least six months from the date of entry, and a green card is necessary. No need for a Visa to enter.
  • Bonaire: Passport must be valid for at least six months from the date of entry, and a green card is necessary. No need for a Visa to enter.

Besides the ABC Islands of the Caribbean Netherlands, you can also travel to the following Caribbean islands (also part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands).

  • St. Maarten: Passport must be valid for at least six months from the date of entry, and a green card is necessary. No need for a Visa to enter.
  • St. Eustatius: Passport must be valid for at least six months from the date of entry, and a green card is necessary. No need for a Visa to enter.
  • Saba: Passport must be valid for at least six months from the date of entry, and a green card is necessary. No need for a Visa to enter.

Travel With Care

Photo: Do your research and travel with care / The Art of Travel Partners

Many of you have messaged me or commented asking how you can keep track of future changes in Visa status? Well, here is the easy answer.

Usually, things don’t change for years or decades. When they do change, they are often excellent or awful.

In other words, either your passport issuing country has made new agreements with another country or a country has severed its ties or changed its Visa rules and/or relationships with your passport issuing country.

Note: Always double-check the destination country’s immigration website before booking any flights or trips. As many of our readers have rightly said, things can change, and you don’t want to be caught off-guard.

Note: Green Card holders who stay out of the US for more than 1-year risk having their green card canceled by USCIS (The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services). When you are traveling abroad, remember, your time out of the country must not exceed one year.

Common Question

Question: Can I travel to [xyz destination] with a Green Card only?

Answer: If you are wondering if you can travel to Canada or Mexico with a Green Card only, unfortunately, the answer is you will still need your passport if you are traveling by air. If you are driving through, legally you only need your Green Card but it’s a good practice to carry your passport as well.

PS: Please comment below if I am missing any other countries or territories. This list of Visa-free travel is for U.S. Green Card holders regardless of their country of citizenship.

Read Next

Indian Citizen on H1B Visa: Countries You Can Visit Without Needing A Visa

Last updated: Dec 7, 2022

As I myself have traveled a lot (on an H1B visa in the past) and run this blog on world travel, I have compiled the ultimate checklist for visa-free travel destinations for Indian citizens living in the United States.

There are as many as 18 countries that would allow an Indian citizen to enter their borders with a valid US single or any multiple-entry visa (F1, H1, B1, etc.) for tourism purposes for up to 6 months. Are you happy? Let’s take a look.

Read: How to Overcome Travel Visa Hassles as an Indian

H1B Visa Free Travel for Indians

Photo: Sun, sand, sea / The Art of Travel Partners

  • Philippines (14 days for holders of either a valid USA, Japanese, Australian, Canadian, Schengen, Singapore or UK visa or permanent resident)
  • South Korea (30 days, Visa not required for holders of a valid visa for Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand or the USA)
  • Taiwan (30-day online travel authority is available to the citizens of India with permanent residency or valid visa of Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, Schengen countries, UK or USA)
  • Georgia (90 days for holders of valid visa or residence permit issued by USA, UK, Japan, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Israel, South Korea, Schengen and GCC countries)
  • Serbia (90 days for valid visa holders and residents of the European Union member states and the USA)
  • Montenegro (30 days for valid visa holders and residents of the European Union member states and USA)
  • Albania (Visa not required up to 90 days for holders of a valid multiple-entry visa issued by the USA, UK or a valid multiple-entry C visa issued by a Schengen Member)
  • Bermuda (90 days for holders of a multiple-entry visa issued by Canada, USA or the United Kingdom and valid for at least 45 days beyond the period of intended stay in Bermuda)
  • Mexico (Visa not required for any valid USA visa holders to enter Mexico with tourist, transit & business purposes. Legal Permanent Residents of USA, Canada, Japan, United Kingdom & Schengen States do not require visa to enter Mexico with tourist, transit & business purposes)
  • Dominican Republic (90 days for holders of a valid visa issued by Canada, USA or any EU Member State)
  • Antigua and Barbuda (Visa on arrival if holding a valid visa or permanent resident card for the USA or Canada)
  • Belize (No visa required for holders of multiple entry USA Visa or Green Card. Indian nationals are required to pay a repatriation fee of BZD1,200 i.e. ~USD600)
  • Guatemala (Visa not required for holders of a valid visa issued by Canada, the USA or a Schengen Member State)
  • Honduras (Visa free entry to holders of a valid visa issued by Canada, the USA or a Schengen Member State)
  • Nicaragua (90 days (Fee USD20) applicable to holders of a valid visa issued by Canada, USA or a Schengen Member State)
  • Costa Rica (30 days for holders of a valid visa issued by Canada, Japan, USA, EU or a Schengen Member State)
  • Panama (Visa requirement waived for holders of a valid visa issued by USA, UK, Canada, Australia or any EU member state, which has been used at least once to enter those countries)
  • Colombia (Visa not required for Nationals of India holding a valid “C” or “D” visa issued by a Schengen Member State or holding a valid visa issued by the USA)
  • São Tomé and Príncipe (15 days for holders of a visa issued by the USA or a Schengen area member state)

Read: How to Overcome Travel Visa Hassles as an Indian

US Territories

The following US Territories are essentially US soil, so you don’t need any visa as long as you board a direct flight from within the US or any destination to which you have a visa.

Also, needless to mention, you can also fly and visit:

Visa Free Travel for Indian Citizens

Photo: The Caribbean Nights / The Art of Travel Partners

Now that we have covered the H1B and F1 visa free travels, did you know your Indian passport lets you travel visa free as well?

As of January 2020, Indian citizens had visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to 52 countries and territories.

  • Nepal (Indian citizens may live and work freely in Nepal under the terms of the 1950 Indo-Nepal Treaty of Peace and Friendship.) Read: 1950 Indo-Nepal Treaty of Peace and Friendship
  • Mauritius (90 days of visa free stay)
  • Micronesia (30 days of visa free stay)
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis (90 days of visa free stay)
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (30 days of visa free stay)
  • Senegal (90 days of visa free stay)
  • Trinidad and Tobago (90 days of visa free stay)
  • Vanuatu (30 days of visa free stay)
  • Bhutan (As long as you wish to stay. Freedom of movement just like as in Nepal.)
  • Dominica (180 days of visa free travel)
  • Ecuador (90 days of visa free travel)
  • El Salvador (90 days of visa free travel)
  • Fiji (120 days of visa free travel)
  • Grenada (90 days of visa free travel)
  • Haiti (90 days of visa free travel)
  • Hong Kong (14 days of visa free stay)
  • Indonesia (30 days of visa free travel but *only from select ports of entry)
  • Jamaica (As long as you wish to stay, no visa required)
  • Samoa (60 days of visa free stay. Entry Permit on arrival)
  • Suriname (90 days of visa free stay. Tourist Card on arrival. Available at Johan Adolf Pengel International Airport)
  • Seychelles (30 days Visitor’s Permit on arrival)
  • Laos (30 days Visa on arrival)
  • Madagascar (30 days Visa on arrival)
  • Malawi (Visa on arrival. They will give you an end date)
  • Maldives (90 days Visa on arrival)
  • Marshall Islands (90 days Visa on arrival)
  • Mauritania (Visa on arrival. On the airport iteself they will give you an end date)
  • Palau (30 days Visa on arrival)
  • Saint Lucia (6 weeks Visa on arrival)
  • Somalia (30 days Visa on arrival, provided an invitation letter issued by the sponsor has been submitted to the Airport Immigration Department at least 2 days before arrival)
  • Tanzania (Visa on arrival. The immigration authorities will provide you your length of stay.)
  • Thailand (15 days Visa on arrival. Visa fee of 1000 Thai Baht needs to be paid in Thai currency. Visa on Arrival has to be obtained at First point of Entry/Landing)
  • Timor-Leste (30 days Visa on arrival)
  • Togo (7 days Visa on arrival)
  • Tuvalu (30 days Visa on arrival)
  • Uganda (Visa on arrival)
  • Bolivia (90 days Visa on arrival only at La Paz airport. Land entry requires prior Visa which is free of cost)
  • Burundi (90 days Visa on arrival)
  • Cambodia (30 days Visa on arrival. 35 USD to be paid in USD)
  • Cape Verde (Visa on arrival. Generally 30-90 days)
  • Comoros (Visa on arrival. Generally 30-90 days)
  • Ethiopia (Visa on arrival. Generally 30-90 days)
  • Guinea-Bissau (90 days Visa on arrival)
  • Guyana (30 days Visa on arrival, provided holding a letter of invitation from sponsor or host; and contact details of sponsor, host or hotel; and two passport photos)
  • Jordan (2 weeks Visa on arrival. Must hold US $1000)

Getting eVisa and Special Permits

Aya Sofia, Turkey

  • Cuba (30 days Tourist Card (Tarjeta deTurista) which can be extended for another 30 days after arrival. Visitors who booked a package through an airline/travel agency usually receive the card on the plane before landing. The visitors can also buy a Tourist Card upon arrival at the José Martí International Airport in Havana)
  • Turkey (e-visa can be applied and obtained online)
  • Singapore (e-visa can be applied and obtained online)
  • Tunisia (Visa not required for tours organized by a travel agency)
  • United Arab Emirates (Tourist visa can be obtained online through Emirates and Etihad airlines)
  • Vietnam (A 30 day visa can be obtained on arrival if prior Online approval has been obtained through a travel agency)
  • Gabon (e-Visa, holders must arrive via Libreville International Airport)
  • Sri Lanka (30 days Electronic Travel Authorisation)
  • Kenya (90 days eVisa)
  • Myanmar (28 days eVisa, holders must arrive via Yangon, Nay Pyi Taw or Mandalay airports)
  • Rwanda (e-visa can be applied and obtained online)
  • Bahrain (14 days e-visa can be applied and obtained online)
  • Zambia (e-visa can be applied and obtained online)
  • Zimbabwe (e-visa can be applied and obtained online)
  • Côte d’Ivoire (90 days eVisa, holders must arrive via Port Bouet Airport)

Do I Need A Visa

As many of you have messaged me or commented that how can you keep track of the changes in future visa status? Well, here is the easy answer. You can bookmark this website. VisaHQ. Just type in your citizenship, where you currently live and where you would want to visit.

VisaHQOnline Application & check for Visa Requirements

Usually, things do not change for years or decades. And when they do, they are often “very good” or “very bad”. In other words, either your country has made new agreements with another country or a country has severed its ties or changed its visa rules and/or relationships with your country.

Lastly, yes, any valid multiple-entry visa (such as H, B, F, etc) will be qualified.

Note: Always double check the destination country’s immigration website before booking any flights or trips. As many of you have rightly said, things can change and you don’t want to be caught off-guard.

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Can You Travel With Valid Visa On Expired Passport Along With a New Passport But No Visa

Can you travel with an old expired passport containing a valid Travel Visa along with a new passport but no Visa? This is a very common question.

Although the answer is simple, there is still confusion around several “what-if” scenarios. Let me try to address all of these concerns in a short, concise paragraph that is easy to read and understand.

Valid Visa On Expired Passport

Individuals with a valid visa on their expired (old) passport may still use that visa by carrying both the old and new passport when they travel. The new passport must be valid and not damaged, of course.

To be on the safe side, the visa on your old passport must have three months of validity left, although it is not required in most cases.

Also, please ensure that the visa you have is an appropriate type of visa required for your principal purpose of travel.

Old Visa Transfer to New Passport

You cannot transfer an old visa from one passport to another. Doing so will require you to apply for a new visa stamp on your newer passport.

If you are just going to travel to a destination for which you already have a valid travel visa, you do not need to worry. Just carry both passports. It is not an uncommon situation. 

 

New Passport New Visa

You can choose to apply for a new visa in the new passport. In such a case, all normal fees and application procedures would be similar to the process for a first-time applicant. So, if it makes sense for you to do so, apply for a new visa.

But note, in that case, your old visa in your old passport will be canceled before issuing the new visa. So, you are not really gaining anything.

Why not apply for a new passport when your current passport is almost 6-8 months away from expiration? Let’s keep the paperwork to the minimum. Let’s focus more on travel and (hopefully) less on travel visas.

Hope this helps! Happy travels!

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