Category Archives: Nature Travel

Nature Travel. Natural wonders of this world. Earth is amazingly beautiful and vast. Get lost in the nature and you will understand everything better. Nature is the closest thing you have in this physical world to feel and experience God.

10 Things to Know Before Taking Indian National Park Safari

For a nature lover, there is no better place than visiting a national park. The flora, fauna, wildlife, and natural beauty of a national park are almost a treat for people living in urban cities and anyone who loves adventure.

Well, it is great news that India is one of the top countries in the world known for its biodiversity.

India has 101 national parks that include wildlife, sanctuaries, marine life, and much more. Boasting some of the rarest animals like One-horned Rhinoceros, White Tigers, Asiatic Lions, and many others, Indian National Parks are a favorite spot for nature enthusiasts and photographers.

Bengal Tiger

People from across the world appreciate this natural beauty. However, one must realize that these are wild predators, and it is a privilege to watch these glorious and magnificent creatures. The least we can do is follow the rules when visiting these parks and taking a safari.

Indian National Park Safari Tips

Every national park in India has its rules and guidelines for visitors. This helps them see the animals but also keep both the animals and people safe.

Please ensure you know about these rules thoroughly and take time to follow them when taking a safari in these parks. Below are 10 common things you should know before taking a safari in Indian National Parks.

Maintain Distance with Animals

Remember that they are in their space. You are just a visitor. You are invading their private space. That is why you must always remember to let the animals be and not try and engage with them. As they walk around in their area, do not disturb them in any way or try and make them afraid or infiltrated on.

One-horned Rhinoceros

Do Not Litter

This is an actual rule of any place across the world. However, more so, in the different Indian National Parks, you may visit. Do not be irresponsible. Do not throw plastic covers or glass bottles around as you travel through the national parks.

Unlike us, animals that inhabit the area do not understand the difference between stepping on different textures. It is your responsibility to ensure that you protect them.

Do Not Smoke or Start Fires

Creating fires or throwing cigarette buds that are not turned off in the national park is dangerous. Fire is a real issue. Often, if you are in an Indian National Park, there are usually designated areas where you can start a campfire, a barbeque, or even smoke. Follow the rule.

One mistake could lead to drastic displacement and a lot of heartache for the inhabitants.

Avoid Feeding Animals

The experts know what they need. By that, it is the people who are handling the national park and the animals themselves. You are not helping by trying to throw food on the road. As much as you think you are helping the animals.

If you do not know what they must or can eat, you have to ensure that you stay away from the idea of feeding animals to satisfy yourself.

Spotted Deer (Chital)

Follow the guide’s instructions

Guides that take you through safaris in Indian National Parks are experts for a reason. They come with years of experience and know what they are talking about.

It is pivotal that you follow their instructions to the tee. Do not try or think you know better than those who have got it and done it for years.

Stay Inside the Vehicle

Safaris have select vehicles that can stand the route and is designed to protect you during animal encounters. So, unless you are advised to get out and walk around the national parks, do not step out of the vehicles. Trust the experts.

A Tiger in Ranthambore National Park

If you are taking a tour without a guide, make sure you stick to the route and don’t go off the way searching for more creatures. Such adventure can put you in a lot of trouble like losing the trail, animal attacks, and more.

Do Not Disturb Their Habitat

Again, you are in the animal zone. Keep it quiet. Parties can be taken elsewhere. When you are in their habitat, respect it. In all likelihood, animals do not like loud noises. Therefore, respect their space.

Avoid playing music or making noises to get a reaction from an animal. It is not just unnecessary; it is also cruel.

Indian Gharial in Chambal River

Stay Silent and Calm

When you are going on a Safari in Indian National Parks, there is every chance that you will have a trip of your lifetime.

Baby Elephants taking a bath

However, the best way to go through the safari is to not disrupt wildlife. They will come and showcase themselves. But if you gasp a little too loudly, you might scare or annoy them away and not get the complete experience of the safari. So, stay calm and be patient.

Wear Light Coloured Clothes

Jarring colors can throw animals away from trying to get closer to the people that are coming to meet the visitors. They usually do not respond well to bright colors. Doing the best to be one with and blend in with flora and fauna is part of the things we do.

This will help us be one with the surroundings making us as travelers more accessible to the animals.

Earthy colored clothes are the best for Safari

Carry Supplies

Safaris usually last a while. So, always carry supplies. This includes ensuring you are prepared for a long ride as the guides take you through different parts of the national parks. You should try and carry supplies like water, basic food, and a garbage bag, so you do not litter.

Additionally, make sure you have the right equipment to make all the memories. However, ensure you do not scare them with flashes.

Never in your safari trip, you should forget that you are venturing into the wildlife’s space and somehow disturbing their habitats. So, by abiding by the rules of the park you are not only respecting the animals but also helping yourself and the animals.

Author Bio

Gulshan Bafna is a wildlife enthusiast and a brilliant photographer. His love for natural beauty can be found on his blog, where he shares all his travel experiences in a beautiful way that most of his followers love to read.

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186-Mile Hike on the Welsh Pembrokeshire Coastline

A strange yelping noise echoed up the cliffs to meet me. The noise rose and fell on the wind and sounded much like a crying baby.

I quickened my pace along the dusty path eager to see down into the coves. Another gust of wind brought more plaintive cries to my ears.

I reached the headland and stopped short on a grassy bluff and peered over the crumbling edge. Far below me was a shingle beach that teemed with activity.

Large figures moved in and out of the turquoise waters, their grey bodies dipping into the surf and diving amongst the waves.

Farther up the beach one of these creatures advanced past the tide line and slid ungracefully across the sand into the foaming sea. I couldn’t believe my eyes. A colony of Atlantic grey seals, right here in the UK.

This incredible evening occurred in mid-September whilst I was walking the Pembrokeshire Coast Path – a 186-mile National Trails hike located in the south of Wales.

Pembrokeshire Coastline

Pembrokeshire (Wales) map by NordNordWest CCBYSA3.0

The route crosses 35,000 feet of ascents and descents which is equivalent to the height of Mount Everest!

The path is populated by 14 harbors and some bigger fishing villages such as Tenby, Pembroke, and Fishguard.

It is renowned for its rugged heathland and windswept landscape due to the harsh weather that blows off the Irish Sea. It has 58 beaches and is, for the most part, a relatively untouched area of coastline.

It was this level of wilderness that attracted me to walk the path in its entirety. Following a series of travel restrictions and lockdowns in the UK, I felt an urge to spend some time exploring the local National Parks in my home country rather than planning to jet abroad only for the trip to get canceled.

Prior to this, I’d walked the 84-mile Hadrian’s Wall Path in northern England. This hike stretched from the east to the west coast which amusingly gave me the right to say I’d walked across the UK.

Despite this, I still wanted to step it up. I felt I had more in me and yearned to do something even more adventurous.

The Pembrokeshire Coast Path seemed like the perfect challenge I’d been looking for. It gave me that added element of raw nature whilst also allowing me to explore an area of the country I’d never visited before.

Gwlad Hud a Lledrith

In fact, the path is known as “Gwlad Hud a Lledrith” in Welsh, which means “The Land of Mystery and Enchantment”, and it’s this remoteness that makes it the perfect home for a breeding seal population.

During the autumn, adult seals flock to the secluded beaches and hidden coves of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park to raise their pups.

Throughout the rest of the year, there’s only a small population in the area and it’s unlikely you’ll see any – let alone up close on the beaches. However, during the 3-4 weeks where their pups can’t swim, the colony remains close to the shore at all times.

Despite knowing this, I still felt strangely aloof about the whole thing. As if it was some myth that could never actually happen. The idea of being on an empty, sweeping beach in the UK watching a colony of seals teach their pups how to swim seemed too good to be true.

Yet there I was, witnessing exactly that. The more I stared, the more the animals seemed to appear from their camouflaged hiding spots amongst the rocks.

I began to recognize small white shapes, about the size of a house cat, flapping at the base of the crumbling cliffs. Those strange noises suddenly had their source.

The fluffy pups lay on their backs in the sun creating quite a racket, clamoring for attention. They moaned and cried out, calling for their mother’s milk.

I dropped my heavy backpack on the floor and sat beside a patch of ferns to watch the amazing natural dynamic unfold below me.

Occasionally the pups would fall asleep and go quiet, or sometimes a tired-looking mother would shuffle over and flop beside her pup for it to have a drink.

I was blessed with crisp blue skies and the cliffs were lit orange by the low Autumnal sun.

Rays of light illuminated the water so clear that I could see the adults diving down and foraging amongst the seaweed, catching fish and collecting crustaceans to eat.

They looked so sleek gliding under the water which only made it more comical seeing them try to move clumsily overland.

Some of the bigger seals rested out to sea glancing about with their whiskered heads bobbing up and down in the water.

From this distance, they looked much like dogs and I had to squint sometimes to convince myself otherwise.

As the sun lowered in the sky the calls and movements of the animals began to dwindle. Growing tired, I pitched my tent right there overlooking the cove.

I set up my cooking equipment and sat staring at the seals, almost in a trance. The wind gently swept through the grass and rippled the canvas of my tent. The blue flame from my stove hissed and the water clicked and rolled in the pan.

I ate a pouch of spicy tomato pasta and sipped at a steaming mug of tea as the sky ran red and the animals fell silent. The shadows lengthened on the beach and the sea turned slate grey as darkness descended.

I put on my hat and gloves and watched my breath rise into the starlit sky. The moon drifted above the ocean and cast a white glimmer onto the tops of the cliffs.

I could see no glow of urban settlements on the horizon nor hear the sound of any human noise. Only the swash of waves and the occasional scuffle of blubber against stone.

I lay in my sleeping bag that night thinking about what I’d set out to achieve on this walk. To have an adventure. To explore my home country. To find some of its untouched pockets of nature, and most of all, to have an experience I’d never forget.

As I drifted to sleep listening to the sound of waves lapping against the beach and a groaning seal roll over in the sand, I felt I’d accomplished exactly that.

Author Bio

My name is Matt (Twitter @MattWalkWild). I’m a 24-year-old Biologist and adventure traveler. I’ve visited 42 countries around the world and particularly love wild and natural landscapes. I write about all things hiking, camping, and walking. I want to encourage others to experience the amazing outdoors and inform them about how to explore it just like I do! Check out my website: mattwalkwild.com

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Top 10 Things You Need To Do In Malaga

Malaga in southern Spain is famous for its sunny weather and sandy beaches, but there’s more to Malaga than simply beach tourism.

Sitting on the Mediterranean coast in Andalusia, this multicultural city has everything: an incredible history, sumptuous cuisine, a thriving art scene, and deep cultural roots.

No matter what kind of traveler you are or what you look for in a holiday, you’ll find something that appeals to you in Malaga.

If you’re looking for some inspiration and suggestions, here are the top ten things you need to do in Malaga.

Malaga is famous for much more than the beach.

Explore Malaga’s History in Alcazaba

Alcazaba Fortress

Malaga is reportedly one of the oldest cities in Europe, with its history dating back to approximately 770 BC when it was founded by the Phoenicians.

Over the years, it was then inhabited by the Romans, Moors, and Christians, all of whom contributed to this city’s diverse, multifaceted history and monuments you can still see today.

Perhaps the best of these is Malaga’s Alcazaba fortress in the city centre. It backs onto a Roman Theatre and sits watch on a hill overlooking the sea.

Built in the 11th century by the Arabs inhabiting the city at the time, this beautiful fortress houses a series of stunning patios and gardens typical of Arab architecture. The building’s defensive nature combines with its palatial character in a visual wonder of marble columns, archways, fountains, and turrets.

You can notice the Moorish-Arabic influence in the architecture

A Roman Theatre dating back to the 1st century AD sits proudly next to this Arab building in a juxtaposition that perfectly reflects Malaga’s multicultural history and heritage.

Finally unearthed in 1951, it’s one of the last vestiges of Malaga’s Roman past and well worth a visit. Over half of its tiered seating remains today, along with its stage. Nowadays, it even occasionally hosts shows as it is so well preserved.

Dive into the City’s Art Scene & Visit Picasso Museum

Patio of the Buenavista Palace

Second only to Madrid in terms of the number of museums, Malaga has made quite the name for itself in the art world. In addition, Malaga is famous for being the birthplace of the widely celebrated painter and sculptor, Pablo Picasso.

The Picasso Museum in this Andalusian city is housed in the 16th-century Palacio de Buenavista, which in itself is a building worth a visit.

Picasso Museum

The work displayed in this museum spans 80 years of Picasso’s art, while its library and archives contain a vast number of titles on Picasso. The museum also has a bookshop selling various books related to Picasso and art in general, as well as a café in a quaint, leafy courtyard if you fancy a break from your day of tourism.

Or if you would like to learn even more about Picasso, you can also head to the Picasso Birthplace Museum (Museo Casa Natal). Take a tour through the rooms of the home where this great painter was born and learn about his family life and Malaga’s influence on his works.

Experience the Importance of Religion in Malaga

Christmas Lights in Malaga

Spanish people are passionate by nature, and their passion applies to religion too. Here in southern Spain, Catholicism is deep-rooted, playing an integral part in the city’s fabric.

The most iconic religious building in Malaga is undoubtedly its cathedral: the Catedral de la Encarnación.

Construction on this Renaissance-Baroque building commenced in the 16th century, on the site of what was previously the city’s great mosque. Today, it forms an unmistakeable part of Malaga’s skyline.

Affectionately referred to by locals as “La Manquita” (or “the one-armed lady”), it gained its nickname thanks to its unfinished south tower. Some historians believe funds to finish the tower were instead donated to America in its fight for independence against Great Britain; others believe the money went towards construction of a new road to Vélez, a town in the east.

A visit to this religious building will take your breath away, thanks to its finely made stained glass windows, its intricate vaulted ceilings, and its imperious columns.

And if you choose to visit Malaga at Easter, you’ll be able to enjoy all the religious fervour of Holy Week in Spain, and Andalusia in particular, when the scent of incense wafts through the streets.

Easter Holiday Celebration 

Religious brotherhoods and associations dressed in robes parade through the streets, carrying ornate religious sculptures and floats (tronas) on their shoulders. They’re usually accompanied by traditional bands that fill the streets with a cacophony of sound in this incredible religious celebration.

Try Local Cuisine

Charcoal smoked sardine espeto

When you visit Malaga, make sure you try the local food. The most famous dish in Malaga is the Sardine espeto (skewer).
You can order Malaga’s espeto speciality at any of the restaurants found along the beachfront.

The sardines are skewered with a stake and then cooked on an open fire in an old fishing boat kept on the sand beside the restaurant. The smoky aroma of these fires will tempt you inside as you walk along the beach promenade.

The Mediterranean diet is lauded worldwide, and Malaga’s location means it can offer up prime land and sea products in its dishes.

Seafood Paella

While in Malaga, you should also give the tapas culture a try. Tapas are small portions of food that are devised to be shared by diners.

So pick a restaurant or tavern, order a few different dishes, and indulge in Malaga’s wonderful cuisine.

Explore Malaga’s Old Town Like a Local

Malaga’s old town is the perfect place for a stroll at any time of day. Its narrow streets are brimming with typical cafés, bustling bars where you can have churros for breakfast, and charming independent shops among big-name brands.

Among its picturesque streets, you’ll find the city’s main market, Mercado de Atarazanas, which should be on your list of things to see and do in Malaga.

The original building sited here was an Arabian shipyard. There is one remnant of this history still standing: the market’s main entrance archway. It has since been incorporated into the rest of the market’s structure, which includes an amazing stained glass window at the rear.

Open in the mornings from Monday to Saturday, locals flock here to buy fresh bread, vegetables, meat, fish, and more at amazing prices.

In addition to shopping here for food, many locals take the time to sit in one of the market’s bars for a caña (small beer) and a bite to eat before going on their way.

Hit the Shops in Malaga

With Spain having contributed many of the world’s famous fashion houses, it’s only natural that there are many shopping options in Malaga.

In Malaga’s old town, Calle Marqués de Larios and its neighboring streets are some of the most popular places for shopping. You’ll find a varied selection of shops here to suit all budgets.

Venturing a little further outside of the old town, you’ll find El Corte Inglés. This Spanish department store is a shopping symbol in every city in the country.

Close by are the Larios and Vialia shopping centres, which also have several restaurants. The latter also has a cinema and it’s combined with Malaga’s main railway station, Malaga María Zambrano.

From here, you can hop on a suburban (cercanías) train to Plaza Mayor, a large shopping complex on the outskirts of the city. The journey won’t take longer than 15 minutes and is well worth it for shopping fans.

At this shopping complex you’ll find all kinds of brand names, especially as Plaza Mayor has recently been extended with the addition of the new McArthurGlen Designer Outlet that’s opened. Whether you shop at H&M, Zara, Adidas, or Ralph Lauren, you’ll find something to please you here.

Not only that, there are lots of restaurants to keep your taste buds happy too, and a cinema that often screens movies in the original English version.

Relax at some Arab Baths

Malaga is the perfect place for a spot of relaxation too. One way to explore its Arab heritage is with a visit to the Hammam Al Andalus in the city centre.

A visit to these Arab baths will allow you to enjoy a divine massage with oils, along with a range of herbal teas, a steam room, and various baths at different temperatures.

And that’s not to mention the stunning architecture of the place. Archways and vaulted ceilings leap over the baths and strategically placed candles throw warm, peaceful light along its corridors.

Try Something More Adventurous: El Caminito del Rey

When it comes to adding something more adventurous to your list of things to do in Malaga, you should consider checking out El Caminito del Rey – the King’s Pathway.

This is an 8 KM (5 miles), linear hiking route through mountains and gorges, and passing by reservoirs.

With its origins dating back to the beginning of the 20th century, this previously hazardous pathway has undergone several renovations to become one of the country’s most popular tourist attractions today. It was initially built so workers could reach the hydroelectric power plants at each end of the route, as well as to transport materials, among other tasks involved in these plants.

The pathway itself is built into the side of the mountain, hanging vertiginously 100 metres above the ground and only a metre wide.

Along the way, you can sneak a peek at the ground or river below through glass floors if you dare, and enjoy incredible views of the surrounding landscape, before finally crossing the hanging bridge at the end.

Go Hiking in Montes de Malaga Natural Park

Photo by Marcos Cortes Troman CC BY-SA 4.0

Further inland, five kilometres north of the city, you’ll find Malaga’s green lung, Montes de Malaga Natural Park. Covering almost 5,000 hectares, it features mountains (some of whose peaks stretch up to 1,000 metres above sea level), the basin of the Guadalmedina River, and rolling valleys.

During your holiday to Malaga, you should take the time to go for a hike here as this area is rich in flora and fauna, and it offers several signposted walking routes and cycling options.

There are also places of archaeological value within the park, including a rock painting, as well as a visitor center that also acts as a museum that explains wine culture, and how bread and oil are made.

Once you’ve finished your hike, make sure you finish with the area’s traditional dish, the Plato de los Montes. This calorific bomb is a hearty dish containing pork loin in lard, a fried egg, and several other fried foods, which usually include potatoes, blood sausage, chorizo, and peppers.

Discover the Surrounding Region with a Cultural Day Trip

Lastly, if you’re visiting Malaga over the last weekend in August, make sure you head to the neighboring town of Frigiliana to enjoy its Three Cultures Festival.

Located to the east of Malaga, Frigiliana is one of Andalusia’s famous White Villages. Its Three Cultures Festival celebrates the Christian, Muslim and Jewish populations that have inhabited this village over the years and helped to build its traditions. It does so in a spectacle filled with lively music, dancing, culinary delights, art, fireworks, and more.

Over the course of four days, the streets are packed with people there to enjoy street performers, workshops, and storytellers, in addition to the official concerts arranged for the event.

One of the most popular aspects of this festival is its ‘Ruta de la Tapa’ (Tapas Route). This tour will take you on a gastronomic adventure around the town to try different tapas in several local establishments.

Malaga’s Attractions are Varied

An old bridge

Ultimately, there are so many things to see and do in Malaga that you’ll be hard-pressed to find the time to manage them all in one trip. That way, you’ll have the perfect excuse to return to this Mediterranean city in the future.

Author Bio

Rhian MacGillivray is a content writer, translator, and blogger (www.malagamama.com). When she’s not busy helping companies to communicate their message with content and translations, she can be found at the beach by her home in sunny southern Spain.

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Camper Van: One of the Best Travel Investments

There are many ways to spice up your travels and ensure that you are getting everything out of them in terms of comfort and convenience. And with so many things to consider on the market, making the right choice can be admittedly a bit difficult.

In this blog, we will look at why we believe a Camper Van is one of the best travel investments you can make to improve the quality and comfort of your travels. If you haven’t thought about a van as an option yet, it’s definitely something worth looking at.

6 Benefits of Owning a Camper Van

If you are dreaming of hitting the open road, amid this coronavirus pandemic, then consider a camper van aka motorhome.

Balancing Comfort & Utility

Volkswagen Autosleeper Clubman GL

The best thing about a van is also the main reason for its existence – it combines comfort and utility, and balances them in a great way that gives you the best of both worlds. It’s hard to overstate how useful a van can be when you have a larger family to ride around with, or a lot of luggage to take with you.

And it can also be great for certain special situations, like when an emergency comes up that requires you to rest somewhere on short notice. All in all, a van can cover many of the important bases for traveling efficiently.

Note: Camper vans due ton their smaller size can be parked in your garage or driveway, which eliminates having any additional storage fee.

Affordable to Own

Photo (Dutch Camper Van) by Charles01 CCBYSA3.0

If you haven’t looked into camper vans yet, you may think that these beasts must cost a fortune. But you would be surprised to know that camper vans are affordable for most people who already owns cars, SUVs, or minivans.

Despite the extra space and additional features, the basic models aren’t much more expensive than a standard minivan. With gas prices at all time low and improved fuel utility, this means you’ll be able to hit the road without overspending on gas.

Note: Camper vans are more fuel efficient than larger RVs.

Easy Maintenance, Affordable Insurance

An Old Volkswagen Camper Van

On top of that, your typical van isn’t that difficult to maintain either. It doesn’t take a lot to keep it in a good condition compared to a regular car, and finding a good insurance quote should not be a problem if you look around.

For example, sites like Quotezone (UK) can provide you with a van insurance quote, but do make sure you’re looking for camper van insurance and not commercial vehicle insurance. While Quotezone is primarily aimed at car and van customers, it can be a great starting reference point for your future search.

Great for Couples and Friends

A Talbot AutoSleeper 1991 model

Imagine road-tripping with your significant other. Or, with your best friend. All without having to worry about having a fixed itinerary or hotel bookings. With a camper van or motorhome, you can make plans as you go. Not only this provides you the privacy and freedom, it is also adventurous.

Any Class B Camper Vans are completely self-contained, which means it makes them a popular choice for camp grounds. You  don’t have to worry about pitch a tent, use an outhouse, or cooking outdoors all while battling unpredictable weather or unfamiliar places.

Great for the Sociable Types

Photo (GMC Chevrolet G30) by Daniela Kloth under GNU1.2

Even if you don’t travel with a family, a van can still be a great investment into your trips that can make them much more comfortable and convenient. If you like getting together with new people, this is one of the best options you have, and you can even throw small parties in there from time to time.

Of course, it can be difficult to keep things clean with so many random people coming in and out, so consider that in advance as well. If you can handle that though, a van is definitely something that will be right up your alley.

Lastly, Safety

Photo (VW Classic Camper van) by Paul Palmer CCBY2.5

We can’t talk about anything that weighs over a ton and moves at such high speed with a metal body without considering safety. Safety is a huge priority for us and it should be all of us.

The good news is all newer models are built incredibly sturdy. Plus these days, you get powerful disc braking systems, parking sensors, backup cameras, etc. in almost all standard models, without paying anything in extra.

Conclusion

These factors and more should get you on the right track and should show you the benefits of investing in a good van.

If you’re still not convinced, just talk to some people who’re already using a van regularly, and get their input. You’ll definitely get many positive responses, and will learn a few more reasons for potentially giving this idea a go if you’re still on the fence about it.

Author Bio

Rosana Beechum is a freelance writer who loves to talk about all things lifestyle, including travel, fashion, money-saving hacks, and more. She’s traveled the world and contributes articles that offer practical advice and tried-and-tested tips.

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Return To Nature: Krka National Park in Croatia

Are you a nature lover who wants to experience something unique and beautiful? Do you love waterfalls, long walks, or cycling in nature? If your answer is Yes, then it is time for Krka National Park in Croatia which is known for its series of 7 waterfalls.

If you are planning to visit Croatia, one of the places you must see is this national park.

One of the waterfalls

How To Get Here

Krka National Park is located in central Dalmatia. It consists of almost the entire course of the famous River Krka and the lower course of the river Cikola.

The northern part of national park Krka is near the town of Knin and the Dinara mountain, where the river springs. The southern part of the park, near the town of Sibenik, is where the river flows into the sea.

River Krka

Nearby are the towns of Skradin and Lozovac. There are at-least eight entrances into the Krka National Park located around the park’s various attractions.

Bike & Hike Friendly

You can visit the park by car, hiking trails, or bicycle routes. The roads to the park are well marked and connected to the main highways. Since the tourist locations are far from each other, some of them you can only visit by excursion boats.

Things To Do In Krka National Park

With a large number of sunny hours, unusual beauty of the waterfall, plenty of green areas, Krka makes for a real natural phenomenon. The National Park includes a large number of attractions that tourists visit, such as:

  • Hiking trails
  • Bike routes
  • Roman military camp
  • Waterfalls
  • Ethno Village
  • Monasteries
  • Medieval fortifications
  • Caves

Skradinski Buk

The first stop from Skradin is Skradinski Buk. You can get there by footpath, bicycle or excursion boat. This ride is in the ticket price and lasts about half an hour. The ship departs every 20 minutes. It is possible to take a dog with you to the National Park if it has protection. Also, you can visit Skradinski Buk on foot from Lozovac, but there is also a bus.

Skradinski Buk is one of the most beautiful waterfalls in this national park. It got the name Buk because of the big noise, created by the water that descends through the rocks. Visitors are also allowed to swim, but only in marked places.

The characteristic of this part of the National Park is a pedestrian, one-way path almost 2 km long. The trail is circular and leads through beautiful landscapes of water and greenery.

On this trail, there are plenty of places to rest. Also, there are beautiful viewpoints that are great for photography. This road leads us over many wooden bridges. There are many mills in this part. You can also visit an ethnic village that presents old crafts.

A large number of souvenir shops and there are also restaurants. The whole footpath is well marked. There are also educational boards with useful information.

From Skradinski Buk you can go further towards the Island Visovac, or a little further Roški slap. The price of these boat trips is additionally charged.

Island Visovac

On this island, there is a monastery with the church of Our Lady of Mercy and a museum. An island rich in greenery and gardens. First of all, it is a place of prayer. You need to be decently dressed when visiting the island.

Roski Slap

Another magnificent waterfall! You can visit it by boat from the island of Visovac and Skradinski Buk, but also by car. This part of the park is known for the rocks that line one another, which is why they were named Necklaces.

From the waterfall, the road leads to a lookout point that gives a beautiful view of the Necklaces.

Krka Monastery

Photo by Sonjabgd CCBYSA3.0

A special place is known as the home of the monks. It is an Orthodox monastery. You can come here by car or boat from Roški slap. The boat ride takes about 1 hour and is extra cost (not included in your park ticket). You can visit the church and the museum.

Manojlovack Slap

Represents the most beautiful viewpoint of the National park. It is also the highest waterfall in the Krka National Park. You can visit this waterfall by car to the parking lot, and then on foot to the viewpoint.

Burnum

Photo by Carole Raddato CCBYSA2.0

A characteristic of this part of the national park is the ancient Roman amphitheatre. It can be reached by car and continue with a walking tour. You can visit alone or accompanied by a guide. This amphitheatre shows the military past of this part of
the country.

Explore Skradin Town

Skradin town, Croatia

One of the entrances to the national park, as mentioned above, is Skradin. The small Mediterranean town is a great starting to visit the national park. During the season, it is very crowded due to tourists, and out of season, you will find a quiet place and a peaceful life of the locals.

With its narrow and long streets, it conquers this place. The colored tall houses, olive trees, old bicycles in front of the door make us peek into every corner. In the main street, there are many wineries. This area is known for its excellent local wine.

Besides to wineries, there are also restaurants, souvenir shops with handmade products. The donkey is an animal that represents the symbol of this area. Old stone steps lead to the landscape with a beautiful view of the marina and the river.

After this part of the city, we come to the promenade along the river. A large number of cafes and the port of boats during the season are the reason why you should walk through this part. Luxury ships sailing through this part of Europe come to Skradin for a break. They provide an unusual sight.

If we go to the other side of the promenade, we will come to a playground for children. There is also a part of the river where many swans have found their place. During the summer there is a small market, where you can buy local products such
as honey, olive oil, figs.

Note: It takes several days to tour the entire National Park. If this is your plan, the ideal solution is to find accommodation in Skradin. We offer hotel and apartment accommodation of various categories.

Plant & Animal World

Due to its pure nature, the National Park is home to various plants and animals. During the visit, we can see animals like turtles, frogs, lizards. There are more than 30 species of fish and over 200 species of birds. When we talk about plants, the most famous is the pyramidal bell that grows in the rocks and is purple.

It takes a lot of time to visit the whole national park! And after the tour, walking, feeling the freshness of the water on your skin, you will be full of impressions and thoughts.

Everyday lifestyle leaves us little time for us. The best thing today is to know how to plan your time and not forget your needs. That is the secret of love for travel.

Krka National Park is an ideal example of this and should be on your “must-see” list!

Tickets & Prices

You can buy tickets at the entrance to the National Park, at various marked places. If you want to save time, you can also buy tickets online (on the National Park’s website).

Ticket price depends on:

  • the location where you buy tickets
  • how old are you, and
  • whether you visit the park individually or in a group

An important factor that affects the price of the ticket is the period during the year when you visit the park. Prices are lower in the months outside the summer tourist season. During the winter, a large part of the national park is not open for visits.

Note: Children up to the age of seven have FREE admission.

Have you already visited this National Park? If so, what are your impressions?

Author Bio

Dragana Šuša is an economist in tourism and a freelance writer. Currently, lives and works in London. Many years of education and work in tourism she has dedicated to works with small and medium businesses. She works on the promotion and advertising of companies in tourism and hospitality through digital marketing. Her main goal is good textual content, Search Engine Optimization (SEO), and Social Media Optimization (SMO). You can connect with her on LinkedIn.

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Top 6 Sunshine Coast Attractions for Nature Lovers

The Sunshine Coast, Queensland is one of the top destinations in Australia, attracting over 3 million visitors a year. Beautiful coastal walks, beaches, tourist attractions, magnificent nature, adrenaline-filled excitement, and great food and beer are just the beginning of all the fun things to do in the Sunshine Coast.

If you’re a nature lover, you’re in luck in your visit to the Sunshine Coast, with all the animals and plant life to see in this amazing holiday destination.

Google maps

The Sunshine Coast is located approximately 100 km (62 mi) north of Brisbane. In this blog, we will share with you our Top 6 attractions for nature lovers.

Noosa National Park

Noosa National Park is situated near Noosa Heads between the Pacific Ocean and the Sunshine Coasts’s northern area, past Lake Weyba to Coolum.  The Headlands Section of the park contains pockets of rainforest where hoop and kauri pines dominate.

There are also areas of open eucalypt forest, wallum heaths, pandanus palms and grasslands. The Peregian Section is known for its wildflowers which blossom in spring, particularly the rare swamp orchid and Christmas bells.

A population of koalas is found in the park, as are mammal species such as the short-nosed bandicoot, common ringtail possum, brushtail possum.

Birds such as the eastern ground parrot, glossy black cockatoo, eastern yellow robin, rufous fantail, satin bowerbird and crimson rosella are all found in the park’s forests.

Headlands in the park are a popular place to watch migrating humpback whales (pictured above).

Noosa Everglades

There are only two everglades in the world, and one of them is right on the sunshine coast along the Noosa River. Float along the serene water that so perfectly reflects the plant life that borders it on either side.

Join an organized cruise so you can just enjoy the feeling of being on the water or hire a kayak and paddle along the water yourself. View the natural plants and animals—the Noosa Everglades are home to over 40% of Australia’s bird species.

Photo by Nadine van Dyk CCBY3.0

Whether you’re a local or an international visitor, there’s something to see on the everglades.

Maleny Botanic Gardens

Wandering through the botanic gardens is a treat for avid botanists, nature lovers, and anyone who enjoys escaping from city life for a little while.

Walk along over 6km of pathways through the gardens (or jump into a golf cart to make getting around the gardens a little easier). Enjoy a picnic in a gazebo or among the scenic grounds. Young ones can run wild through the fairy gardens while you relax.

Rainbow Lorikeet

The botanic gardens also feature Bird World—a place where you can get hands-on with live birds and get a photo with them for an experience you’ll never forget.

Australia Zoo

The Australia Zoo, affectionally subtitles the Home of the Crocodile Hunter, is the Zoo that Steve Irwin and now his family have always strived to make the biggest, best wildlife conservation facility in the world. The zoo has won a whole host of awards for the work it does to help animals and to educate visitors.

Steve Irwin (2005)/ Photo by Richard Giles CCSA3.0

When you arrive at the zoo you might find yourself overwhelmed with all there is to see and do! Throughout the day there are several animal shows you can watch to learn more about the residents of the zoo.

Not to mention the up close and personal animal encounters you can have. You can even adopt an animal and pay to keep it happy and safe throughout its life.

Glass House Mountains

The Glass House Mountains are a cluster of 13 hills that rise abruptly from the coastal plain on the Sunshine Coast. The highest hill is Mount Beerwah at 556 metres above sea level, but the most identifiable of all the hills is Mount Tibrogargan which from certain angles bears a resemblance to a face staring east towards the ocean.

Photo by Bidgee CCBY3.0

The Glass House Mountains are located in the traditional lands of the Jinibara and Gubbi Gubbi people. Local Natives have an elaborate legend about the mountains.

Sea Life Aquarium

When you haven’t had enough of amazing animals after your trip to the zoo, you can head into the SeaLife Aquarium. Walk through the aquarium and take a look at the underwater life from a perspective you won’t get anywhere else.

Lionfish

See the penguins, seals, sharks, smaller fish, and many more exotics aquatic species!

Coral Reef

Walk through the ocean tunnel and look around as sharks, rays, reef fish, and more swim above and next to you. The Tidal Touchpool gives visitors of all ages the opportunity to get their hands wet and touch some real sea stars, sea cucumbers, and more.

A Manatee

There’s plenty of fun things to do in the Sunshine Coast if you’re an animal lover. from getting up close and personal with animals to wandering through scenic nature.

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225 National Parks in Africa: List of National Parks

There are over 225 National Parks and popular Game Reserves on the African continent. National parks can be found in a large majority of African countries, being most numerous in Kenya, Tanzania, Madagascar, Namibia, and South Africa.

Many of these parks are on the UNESCO World Heritage List. They can be visited for safaris and to see the African flora and fauna.

The mighty lion in Botswana

Some nations also have considerable areas designated as private parks, game reserves, forest reserves, marine reserves, national reserves, and natural parks.

We have selected the most popular Game Reserves to be included in this list of National Parks because we believe you should not skip them. They are equally as impressive as any National Parks on this list.

National Parks in Africa

Listing all countries alphabetically (A to Z).

Algeria

Sahara desert, Algeria

  • Alhaggar National Park
  • Belezma National Park
  • Chrea National Park
  • Djebel Aissa National Park
  • Djurdjura National Park
  • El Kala National Park
  • Gouraya National Park
  • Taza National Park
  • Theniet El Had National Park
  • Tlemcen National Park

Angola

Sunset in Angola

  • Bicauri National Park
  • Cameia National Park
  • Cangandala National Park
  • Iona National Park
  • Longa-Mavinga National Park
  • Luenge National Park
  • Luiana National Park
  • Mucusso National Park
  • Mupa National Park
  • Quiçama National Park

Benin

Antelope calf drinking mother’s milk, Benin

  • Pendjari National Park
  • W National Park — also called W of the Niger National Park spanning Niger, Benin & Burkina Faso

Botswana

A leopard in Okavango Delta in Moremi National Park, Botswana

  • Central Kalahari Game Reserve
  • Chobe National Park
  • Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park
  • Makgadikgadi Pans National Park
  • Moremi National Park  in the heart of the Okavango Delta

Burkina Faso

Oryx Antelope (almost near extinction in the wild)

  • Arli National Park
  • Deux Balés National Park
  • Kaboré Tambi National Park formerly called Pô National Park
  • W National Park — also called W of the Niger National Park spanning Niger, Benin & Burkina Faso

Burundi

  • Kibira National Park
  • Risizi National Park
  • Rurubu National Park

Cameroon

Mount Cameroon, Africa

  • Bénoué National Park
  • Bouba Njida National Park
  • Boumba Bek National Park
  • Campo Ma’an National Park
  • Faro National Park
  • Korup National Park
  • Lobéké National Park
  • Nki National Park
  • Waza National Park

Cape Verde

Fogo volcano

  • Fogo National Park

Central African Republic

  • St. Floris National Park
  • André Félix National Park
  • Bamingui-Bangoran National Park
  • Dzanga-Ndoki National Park
  • Mbaéré Bodingué National Park

Chad

A Caravan in Chad’s Sahara

  • Aouk National Park
  • Goz Beïda National Park
  • Manda National Park
  • Zakouma National Park

Democratic Republic of the Congo

A chimpanzee in the wild

  • Garamba National Park
  • Virunga National Park
  • Kahuzi-Biéga National Park
  • Kundelungu National Park
  • Lomami National Park
  • Maiko National Park
  • Mangroves National Park
  • Salonga National Park (North and South sections)
  • Upemba National Park
  • Okapi Wildlife Reserve (Note: This is not a national park. This is a reserve with core protection and multi-use areas)

Republic of the Congo

A Mandrill Monkey in Congo

  • Conkouati-Douli National Park
  • Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park
  • Ntokou-Pikounda National Park
  • Odzala-Kokoua National Park
  • Ougoue Lekiti National Park

Côte d’Ivoire

  • Assagny National Park
  • Banco National Park
  • Comoé National Park
  • Îles Ehotilés National Park
  • Marahoué National Park
  • Mont Nimba National Park
  • Mont Péko National Park
  • Mont Sângbé National Park
  • Taï National Park

Djibouti

  • Day Forest National Park
  • Djibouti National Park
  • Yoboki National Park

Egypt

White Desert National Park, Egypt

  • Gabal Elba National Park
  • Lake Burullus Protectorate
  • Lake Qarun Protectorate
  • Nabq Protected Area
  • Ras Muhammad National Park
  • Saint Katherine Protectorate
  • Sannur Valley Cave Protectorate
  • Siwa Oasis
  • Taba Protected Area
  • Wadi Allaqi Biosphere Reserve
  • Wadi El Gamal National Park
  • Wadi El Rayan Protectorate
  • White Desert National Park

Equatorial Guinea

  • Monte Alen Park

Eritrea

Mountains in Eritrea

  • Dahlak Marine National Park
  • Semenawi Bahri National Park

Ethiopia

Simien Mountain Gelada, Ethiopia

  • Abijatta Shalla Lakes National Park
  • Awash National Park
  • Bale Mountains National Park
  • Mago National Park
  • Nechisar National Park
  • Omo National Park
  • Simien National Park — stunning mountain scenery and important wildlife populations in Ethiopia
  • Yangudi Rassa National Park

Kenya

Maasai Mara

  • Aberdare National Park
  • Amboseli National Park
  • Lake Nakuru National Park
  • Meru National Park
  • Mount Elgon National Park
  • Nairobi National Park
  • Samburu National Park
  • Sibiloi National Park
  • Tsavo National Park (East and West)
  • Maasai Mara Game Reserve (Note: not a National Park but the most popular destination in Kenya)

Gabon

A herd of African Buffalo

  • Akanda National Park
  • Batéké Plateau National Park
  • Birougou National Park
  • Crystal Mountains National Park
  • Ivindo National Park
  • Loango National Park
  • Lopé National Park
  • Mayumba National Park
  • Minkébé National Park
  • Moukalaba-Doudau National Park
  • Mwangné National Park
  • Pongara National Park
  • Waka National Park

Gambia

  • Abuko National Park
  • Bijilo National Park
  • Kiang West National Park
  • Niumi National Park
  • River Gambia National Park

Ghana

Life in Ghana, West Africa

  • Bia National Park
  • Bui National Park
  • Digya National Park
  • Kakum National Park
  • Kalakpa Game Production Reserve
  • Mole National Park
  • Nini-Suhien National Park

Guinea

  • Badiar National Park
  • Haut Niger National Park

Guinea-Bissau

  • Cacheu River National Park
  • João Vieira Marine Park
  • Orango Islands National Park

Lesotho

  • Sehlabathebe National Park — a remote mountain reserve great for hiking with rare wildlife, impressive waterfalls, and ancient rock paintings and stone shelters

Malawi

  • Lake Malawi National Park — pictured above
  • Kasungu National Park
  • Lengwe National Park
  • Liwonde National Park
  • Nyika National Park — a large highland national park in Malawi

Mozambique

A Nyala Antelope in Mozambique

  • Gorongosa National Park
  • Limpopo National Park

Namibia

Antelopes in a flowers meadow in Etosha National Park, Namibia

  • Ai-Ais/Richtersveld Transfrontier Park including the Fish River Canyon Park
  • Bwabwata National Parkcomposed by ex “Caprivi Game Park” and ex “Mahango Game Reserve”
  • Etosha National Park — abundant wildlife in the “big white place”
  • Fish River Canyon Park the second largest canyon in the world
  • Khaudum National Park — maybe the most remote of all Namibian national parks, known for its tourist-terrorizing elephants
  • Mudumu National Park
  • Namib-Naukluft National Park — contains the famous Sossusvlei valley and the world’s highest dunes
  • Nkasa Lupala National Park
  • Skeleton Coast National Park
  • Waterberg Plateau Park — another good place to watch wildlife

Niger

  • W National Park — also called W of the Niger National Park spanning Niger, Benin & Burkina Faso

Nigeria

Zebra is common across sub-sharan Africa

  • Chad Basin National Park
  • Cross River National Park (Okavango and Oban sections)
  • Gashaka-Gumti National Park
  • Kainji National Park (Borgu and Zugurma sections)
  • Kamuku National Park
  • Okomu National Park
  • Old Oyo National Park
  • Yankari National Park

Rwanda

Rwanda is the best place in the world to see Silverback Gorillas

  • Akagera National Park
  • Volcanoes National Park — in Rwanda is full of impressive rainforest and volcanic scenery of the Virunga Mountains and is perhaps the best place in the world to see rare mountain gorillas. Across the border, in Uganda, it is known as Mgahinga Gorilla National Park.
  • Gishwati Forest
  • Nyungwe Forest National Park

São Tomé and Príncipe

  • Obo National Park

Senegal

  • Basse Casamance National Park
  • Isles des Madeleines National Park
  • Langue de Barbarie National Park
  • Djoudj National Bird Sanctuary
  • Niokolo-Koba National Park
  • Saloum Delta National Park

Seychelles

A beach in Seychelles

  • Curieuse Marine National Park
  • Morne Seychellois National Park
  • Praslin National Park
  • Ste. Anne Marine National Park

Sierra Leone

  • Gola Rainforest National Park
  • Outamba-Kilimi National Park
  • Western Area National Park

Somalia

  • Daallo Mountain
  • Hargeisa National Park
  • Hobyo grasslands and shrublands
  • Jilib National Park
  • Kismayo National Park
  • Lag Badana National Park

South Africa

A Yellow Billed Hornbill in the mountains of Pilanesberg in South Africa

  • Addo Elephant National Park
  • Agulhas National Park
  • Ai-Ais/Richtersveld Transfrontier Park
  • Augrabies Falls National Park
  • Bontebok National Park
  • Camdeboo National Park
  • Golden Gate Highlands National Park
  • Karoo National Park
  • Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park
  • Knysna National Lake Area
  • Kruger National Park
  • Mapungubwe National Park
  • Marakele National Park
  • Mokala National Park
  • Mountain Zebra National Park
  • Namaqua National Park
  • Table Mountain National Park
  • Tankwa Karoo National Park
  • Tsitsikamma National Park
  • West Coast National Park
  • Wilderness National Park
  • Hluhluwe–iMfolozi Park

South Sudan

  • Bandingilo National Park
  • Boma National Park
  • Nimule National Park
  • Southern National Park

Nile Crocodile in Sudan

Sudan

  • Dinder National Park
  • Lantoto National Park
  • Radom National Park
  • Suakin Archipelago National Park

Swaziland

  • Hlane Royal National Park known for its Rhinos

Tanzania

An Elephant Family in Serengeti, Tanzania

  • Arusha National Park
  • Gombe Stream National Park
  • Mount Kilimanjaro National Park
  • Lake Manyara National Park
  • Mahale Mountains
  • Mikumi National Park
  • Mkomazi Game Reserve
  • Ngorongoro Conservancy
  • Ruaha National Park
  • Rubondo Island National Park
  • Serengeti National Park — the biggest national park in Tanzania, perhaps the archetypal African game park; becomes the Maasai Mara National Reserve over the border in Kenya
  • Selous Game Reserve
  • Tarangire National Park — one of the best places in the world to see lions

Togo

  • Fazao-Malfakassa National Park
  • Fosse aux Lions National Park
  • Kéran National Park

Tunisia

  • Bou-Hedma National Park
  • Boukornine National Park
  • Chaambi National Park
  • El Feidja National Park
  • Ichkeul National Park
  • Jebil National Park
  • Sidi Toui National Park
  • Zembra and Zembretta Islands National Park

Uganda

A mountain Gorilla in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda

  • Bwindi Impenetrable National Park
  • Kabelaga National Park
  • Kidepo Valley National Park
  • Murchison Falls National Park
  • Queen Elizabeth National Park
  • Rwenzori National Park home of the almost mythical, otherworldly scenery of the Mountains of the Moon in Uganda

Zambia

  • Blue Lagoon National Park — very accessible
  • Kafue National Park — the largest national park of the country
  • Lavushi Manda National Park
  • Liuwa plains National Park
  • Lochinvar National Park — excellent for bird watching
  • Lower Zambezi National Park
  • Luambe National Park — used to be the president’s private game reserve, now pristine wilderness without mass tourism
  • Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park
  • Nsumbu National Park — used to be very popular in the 1970s but has declined in the last decades
  • North Luangwa National Park — one of Africa’s great safari destinations
  • Nyika National Park
  • South Luangwa National Park

Zimbabwe

  • Victoria Falls National Park — one of the world’s largest waterfalls (pictured above)
  • Gonarezhou National Park
  • Chimanimani National Park
  • Chizarira National Park
  • Hwange National Park
  • Kazuma Pan National Park
  • Mana Pools National Park
  • Matobo National Park
  • Matusadona National Park
  • Nyanga National Park
  • Zambezi National Park

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Our 7 Days Kenya Safari and the Big Five Game

Africa marks our 6th continent. Since Kenya is one of the best destinations to go for a Safari, we picked it as our first country to explore in Africa. It has been on our bucket list for so long and at last, we were about to experience a new continent!

We were excited! Moreover, we were going to see the “Big Five” in the wild! We picked Australken Tours and Travel as our safari company and they thoroughly impressed us! In short, we highly recommend them! They are mid-budget-range, locally owned and operated, flexible, and very, very professional!

Magical Kenya

In Africa, the Big Five game animals are the Lion, Leopard, Rhinoceros, Elephant, and African Buffalo. The term “big five” was coined by big-game hunters in the colonial past, and it refers to the five most difficult animals in Africa to hunt on “foot” but is now also widely used by safari tour operators.

That said, we were in for a surprise because on our 7 days safari we saw animals which we did not even know exists (such as the ones pictured below)!

Waterbuck mating

Our 7 Days Kenya Safari

We’ll first share what was on our safari itinerary plan which then follows our experiences!

Day 0: Get to Nairobi

We arrived in Kenya late evening. This is the day where you will mostly rest and meet your tour operators and discuss your final safari logistics and trip plan!

Nairobi traffic 

Day 1: Nairobi to Amboseli

Trip plan: Depart from Nairobi for Amboseli National Park. Check-in and have lunch at AA Amboseli Lodge. Later proceed for the evening game drive in search of gigantic elephants the park is famous for, with chances of seeing lions, giraffe, zebra, buffalo, hippos, and different species of birds not forgetting the views of Mt. Kilimanjaro on a clear day. Meal plan (Lunch & Dinner provided)

Our Experience: Jambo, Kenya!

Giraffe and Zebras are everywhere in Kenya! You don’t even have to go to a park!

We woke up early morning (partially because we were jet-lagged and also because we were super excited to begin our safari!) We ate breakfast at our hotel and met Zippy our tour operator. She introduced us to our safari guide/driver, Albanus who has been doing safari tours for the past 29 years!

Since we chose a private safari tour, it was just two of us and our safari driver/guide. After a warm introduction, we were picked from our Nairobi hotel and started our first day of Safari towards the Amboseli National Park.

It was a lovely, sunny day. The warmth of the sun was so energizing. As we started our drive south towards Amboseli, to add to our adventure, our vehicle broke down midway. While we waited for it to be fixed, we saw Giraffe, Zebras, Donkeys, and pretty wildflowers by the roadsides.

Our safari van was fixed in 2 hours and we took some cool photos and stretched a bit and talked about the culture, tribes, and wildlife in Kenya!

Highway to Mombasa

The drive to Amboseli along the Mombasa highway was spectacular. One thing that really stood out at first was the magnificent landscape of Kenya. Red soil, beautiful landscape, cattle grazing, almost everything along the road was something new and different for our eyes!

During our drive, we crossed multiple small towns. It was very interesting to see life in rural Kenya as we drove through these small towns. Many people waved and smiled as we passed through; such a great welcome.

Not to forget the Acacia tree with birds nest and butterflies humming around, it was truly a moment of bliss. Mid-January is the season for mangoes in Kenya, so we also grabbed a bag of mangoes from the street vendors.

Morning view from our AA Amboseli lodge 

Finally, we reached our lodge, quickly grabbed lunch, checked into our super cute tent and in the evening we headed out for our first game drive. We saw tons of Zebra very close to the park.

Next, we entered the park and caught a family of elephants grazing. We were surrounded by elephants and it was just so spectacular.

Amboseli is known for its huge Elephant population 

Oh, another fun story, while we were entering Amboseli National Park, a Maasai man came to sell us handicraft. We did not want to buy a souvenir on our first day so he proposed bartering since he loved our The Art of Travel wooden watch. We exchanged our wood watch for a Maasai women wood sculpture.

It was the first time in our travels that we have bartered. This was an amazing experience! He was happy and we were happy! What a day! With all these fond memories our Day one of African safari came to an end. What an adventure!

Day 2: Amboseli National Park

Trip plan: After breakfast, we spend the day exploring the park. We also walked to the observation hill for the scenic view of the park and picnic lunch. Meal plan (Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner provided)

Our Experience: A spectacular view of Kilimanjaro

Glorious view of Mt. Kilimanjaro

With sounds of rain and thunder, we woke up early morning. The rain had stopped during sunrise and we caught glimpse of Mount Kilimanjaro standing tall in all glory. We were very lucky.

After a quick breakfast at the camp, we started our day at the park. During our drive, we saw many new animals.

A Cheetah family 

Playful yellow baboon monkeys, a lonely wildebeest, happy family of hippos, family of 3 cheetah all out for their fresh meal hunt, happy flamingo and Pelicans in the swamp, sneaky fox, busy Pumba, cunning hyena, skeptical ostrich, sassy giraffe, curious buffalo, herds of elephants, impala, and gazelle all around the park. Not to forget hundreds of species of birds on the ground as well as flying.

Pink Flamingos 

We went to the observation point for lunch where we had 360-view of the park. We ended the day at Masai Mara village where we saw cultural welcome dance and learned how the community functions in the tour through the tiny village.

Maasai tribe of Amboseli 

Day 3: Drive to Lake Naivasha

Trip plan: After an early breakfast departs from Amboseli passing via the outskirts of Nairobi en route to the Great Rift Valley where we will have a stopover to admire the escarpment before we proceed Lake Naivasha where we will arrive in time for lunch at West beach camp. Later we will proceed for an hour’s boat ride with chances of seeing hippo and different species of birds. Meal plan (Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner provided)

Our Experience: Everything happens for a reason

Early morning we started towards Lake Naivasha from Amboseli. Our van broke down again (Ugh!). So while our van was getting fixed we had some unforgettable moments interacting with the locals.

Our van broke it in front of a local handicraft store which was perfect for us to buy some souvenirs and check out local handicrafts. The lady at the shop was really sweet and she had some really cute collection. We bought a few souvenirs here (pictured below).

We moved along but the car needed more maintenance. We had to stop by a small town. While we were thinking about how unfortunate it is to have our car broken and possibly miss the activity planned for the day we spotted a beautiful Masai mother feeding her little baby girl.

A Maasai with her baby

I was watching her and the baby who was very friendly. The Maasai woman could not speak much English but she looked at us and smiled. I asked if I could take a picture with her and she was absolutely okay. After the photo and some interactions, she said “little money” and I was happy to give some money to the mother.

Next, we realized that there is a street market across the road selling shoes and all kinds of stuff. I was in much need of shoes since my only shoes broke on day 1 of safari (what a stroke of luck, right) so I bought a pair of safari type boots for 400 Kenyan shillings (i.e. $4 USD). It kind of looked somewhat tarnished but it did serve my desperate need since I was in my flip flops.

Shopping for shoes 

It also made me appreciate simple things in life and to be humble. I have nearly 50 pairs of shoes back home but all I needed was one.

Moving on to another mishap we were out of our camera’s SD card capacity in just 2 days. We underestimated how many pictures we would take and we needed an SD card which is really hard to find in small towns. Still, we inquired the guy who sold shoes if we can find an SD card anywhere. He directed us to the cyber cafe nearby.

We went to the cyber cafe but they did not have an SD card for sale. Turns out that the guy working there is a photographer himself. He offered us to loan his SD card but we were not coming back there. We asked if he could sell to us and buy a new one for himself.

He was really sweet (and helpful and honest). He agreed to sell his memory card for the price that is sold in the market rather than asking us for an insane amount since we were in high need of that. (Needless to say, we are friends now! When you travel with an open mind you make friends from all walks of life.)

By the time we did all our necessary shopping our van was ready. We were really happy that we used the time and found what we needed. Just when we hit the highway the van started acting up again. The radiator got so heated that smoke and water was coming out, the car stopped again for the third time absolutely In the middle of nowhere.

We had a deep sigh this time because now we are not only missing the boat ride at Lake Nakuru which was planned for the day but we are stuck absolutely out of nowhere. Our driver was thinking and figuring out what to do, what is the nearest town, etc.

Suddenly an old Maasai man who lived nearby came for help, then another young Maasai shepherd came to help. They all greeted us with a handshake and smile. The old man’s wife also came by and got some clean water for the car. They were curious.

The old man asked Salil to let him see things through the camera lens. He was so happy when he could see things far away up close through the zoom lens. It was a moment of joy.

Then all the men pushed the van if it could work after we put the clean water but it didn’t. Luckily since our van was not functioning as well from day 1 another van was on its way from Nairobi. We waited a while and it finally came to our rescue.

We got on the new van and started to contemplate that if our van did not break maybe we would not have such an authentic local experience and get to know how warm, nice, and helpful Kenyan people really are.

We stared towards Lake Naivasha and stopped by Great Rift Valley which was spectacular. Finally, late in the evening we reached our accommodation near Lake Lake Naivasha and ended the day with some really memorable experience and a delicious dinner.

At this time we were thinking that we have made the best of every situation thrown at us. We made lemonade when life gave us lemons for real.

We ended the day at West Beach Camp by the shores of Lake Naivasha! It was a gorgeous lodge and we were the only guests besides one another couple! Both the sunsets and sunrise in Kenya are spectacular.

Sunrise from West beach camp

Day 4: Lake Nakuru

Trip plan: After breakfast, we will depart from Lake Naivasha for Lake Nakuru National park where we will explore the park with a chance of seeing rhino, giraffe, buffalo, zebra, baboon, monkey, leopard among other wild not forgetting a visit to the baboon cliff for the scenic view of the park. We will also explore the shores of Lake Nakuru with the chances of seeing flamingos. Meal plan (Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner provided)

Our Experience: Something unexpected

Morning view at West Beach Camp, Lake Naivasha

We woke up, ate breakfast and as planned we headed to Lake Nakuru national park which has the salty lake Called Nakuru. On the way there we saw a lot of wildlife!

As we were exploring Nakuru, out of nowhere, we saw a lone male lion. This was the first time we saw a lion. He was a big male taking a nap under a bush. After about 30 minutes of waiting, he did stand up to watch us. He did not seem bothered at all and we felt the thrill of seeing a huge lion so close.

Next, we saw a huge troop of olive baboon monkeys, the zeal of zebras, heads of buffalo running, mommy and baby white rhino chilling, Waterbuck, gazelle, pumbas playing, and dozens of birds.

It was unreal for us to see a lion, we were not even expecting. We had picnic lunch at baboon cliff where we got a good view of the park and salty lake. It was really peaceful up the hill.

Lake Nakuru

The water level is rising at the park and it’s flooding a lot of sections in the park. The view at Lake Nakuru was unreal; the trees were half under the water and dead, making them home for birds to stop by.

It was a lovely day at Nauru. The camp where we stayed had such amazing food we were relaxed and excited for Masai Mara.

A mother and baby Rhino at Nakuru

Day 5: Lake Naivasha and Maasai Mara

Trip plan: After breakfast, we will continue with our safari to the renowned Maasai Mara game reserve which is Kenya’s premier game reserve. It is the home of the “big five” – lion, leopard, buffalo, rhino, and elephant, as well as cheetah, zebra, giraffe and vast herds of plains antelope and numerous other wildlife. We will arrive in time for lunch at Osero luxury Camp followed by afternoon game drive before you return to Osero luxury camp to wait for dinner followed by overnight. Meal plan (Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner provided)

Our Experience: Hakuna Matata

We woke up early morning and headed to Lake Naivasha for a boat ride. We were supposed to do the boat ride on day 3 but we did manage to squeeze this on day 5.

 

Lake Naivasha is a freshwater lake, unlike Lake Nakuru which is a saltwater lake. We had a memorable boat ride where we spotted numerous birds singing, cruising, and sunbathing on the trees.

We also saw a lot of hippos here! They are mighty creatures and the babies look so cute!

The highlights of lake Naivasha were seeing green plants grow on the lake, the fishermen catching fish, hippos with their family and an eagle hunting fish from the water. These are some moments we will always remember.

After Lake Naivasha, we headed towards Masai Mara straight. It was a long drive but we could see so much of the country by land. Finally, after a long drive, we reached Masai Mara.

The moment we reached Masai Mara we could instantly feel how different it is from other parks we have been. Not just the size but the landscape. It was interesting and unique. Vast grassland, meadows, small hills around, different kinds of trees (like the sausage tree and fig trees) and scattered acacia trees it was all adding to its beauty.

It was late afternoon game drive we were spotting new animals we have never seen like Topi, Dik-Dik, and Steenbok.

Topi

We were driving and suddenly we spotted three young male lions sleeping and fooling around. They were muscular, strong, and powerful. We watched them take a nap and change bushes. It’s rare to see three male lions all together but we were lucky.

Two teenage lions

As it was about time to exit the park we spotted a family of Cheetah. A mother and 3 cubs chilling. This was the first time we saw cheetah so close. They are so lean and curious. They look adorable too.

With an amazing first game drive at Masai Mara, we headed to our lodge. On our way back just outside the park, we saw so many Pumba running around with their tail up. They are so cute to watch.

Jackal

There was also a Jackal running across the road. We followed him for a while and it ran away.

Our lodge was deep inside the park in the wooded area. We had dinner at the lodge where Maasai people danced for us. They asked Salil to join and so Salil did participate. We’ll share the Maasai dance video on YouTube.

Maasai welcome dance

At night we could hear Hyena howling. We also heard elephants and we woke up to birds chirping. What an experience!

Day 6: Maasai Mara

Trip plan: We will spend the whole day exploring the expansive Maasai Mara game reserve in search of Elephant, Zebra, Wildebeest, Rhino, Buffalo, Lion, Cheetah, Leopard and other plains game with a visit to the Mara river where we might have a chance to see hippo and crocodile. We will return to Osero luxury camp to wait for dinner followed by overnight. Meal plan (Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner provided)

Our Experience: A very special moment

It started with pretty heavy rain early morning in Masai Mara but our guide assured us that it will still be a great game drive because animals, unlike humans, are not bothered by the rain.

We were driving towards the park early morning and the rain started to slow down a bit. On our way, we spotted two Masai kids in school uniform trying to cross a stream and go school.

They were small and after the rain, the stream had got to the road. We asked our guide to stop and offer them a ride to school. They were very happy. We dropped them at their school and they smiled and said ‘Asante’ which means ‘Thank you’ in Swahili.

We had just started our game drive in Masai Mara and thankfully the rain had also stopped. As we were watching some game around the park our guide got a call from his friend. After the call, he said, “guys, sit down. I think we’ve got something.”

Usually, the guides have a radio where they share what animals are spotted or they call and let other guides know about any major game around.

Also until the very end of our safari, we realized that guides usually don’t tell you what you’re going to see next or what can be seen. It totally makes sense because until today we were never told what exactly we are seeing, so every time we saw something we were always pleasantly surprised.

We knew there is something coming up but honestly, we did not pay much attention to what it would be. During that drive, we were just admiring the beauty of the park and landscape.

Suddenly we were on a road where few vehicles were stopped. We then knew there’s got to be something here hence so many vehicles. Our guide said “here is a pride of lion sleeping on the road”.

Our jaws opened wide as we saw 13 lions 8 females and 5 cubs having their siesta time. It was such a wonderful surprise. We luckily got a good spot to admire these sleeping lions on the road. Some cubs were curious and looking at us. Some were going back and forth around the female lioness for milk.

We saw them pet each other, cuddle, nap, stretch, stand, and sleep again. It was just magical. Hard to comprehend in words.

An hour felt like a minute. That mother-child bond and love we encountered was one of the most special moments at Maasai Mara. Our heart was filled with joy.

As of the 6th day of our Safari, we have seen 4 of the big 5 and many other interesting and important members of Africa’s beautiful savannas. Now we were on a hunt for the big cat aka Leopard.

Leopards are very shy animals unlike cheetah and the hardest to spot among the big five. Since it rained all night the road was very muddy. We went on a hunt around a lot of places where we could spot leopards like the fig tree, sausage tree, and the famous acacia tree.

We saw a wildebeest leg handing on a tree. Most likely a leopard must have had its meal there. There were no signs of leopard around and in all honesty, we did not feel sad about that. Nature and animals have their own rule and we cannot challenge that.

This was not a zoo where one can always trace an animal. The wildlife here is part of the vast African Savanna where we humans are no one but visitors in their homeland. With that registered in our brain and with much respect for the wildlife we drove towards the Mara River where the great migration from Serengeti of Tanzania to Masai Mara of Kenya happens.

On the border of Tanzania (behind us) and Kenya (in front)

On the way, we stopped at the border of Kenya/Tanzania. Such an interesting place. We were also thinking about how all these animals cross borders and that nature is not bound by any county or borders.

We reached the Mara river and took a short hike around the river with a ranger. This was our first hike experience at the park. It was beautiful and remarkable to set our foot and walk through the land of some deadly predators.

The famous Mara river full of hippos and crocodiles

We spotted some hippos in the river and the guide gave us a lot of information about the wildlife there. After that, we started our way back to our camp. On the way back we spotted two Waterbucks mating putting in a show for everyone. We also saw a lot of African Ostriches.

By sunset, we made it back to our camp to enjoy the evening. We enjoyed our gorgeous tent, had a wonderful conversation with the Masai guard, and a very scrumptious dinner with our guide. It was a day filled with the most pleasant surprise of all.

Day 7: Maasai Mara to Nairobi

Trip plan: Early morning game drive followed by breakfast then we will depart from Maasai Mara as we continue with your journey passing via Narok town then proceed to Nairobi where we will be dropped to catch our homebound flight. Meal plan (Breakfast provided)

Our Experience: Farewell until we meet again

The last day of our Safari. Just the thought of this made me teary and sad. As I was contemplating over my cup of Kenyan tea about this entire Safari trip and all the beautiful encounters with all different species of wildlife.

With Maasai people

The breathtaking views of the African savannah, the gorgeous Acacia trees, the bushes, the insects, the birds, the view of Masai cattle grazing, the smiles of kids waving, the people, the food, the smell of the air, the red land, everything almost everything that we had experienced in these 6 days will be safely treasured as beautiful moments in Africa.

Our Osero luxury camp in Maasai Mara

We checked out from our camp and went for one last quick drive around the park to bid farewell to the beautiful land and then headed towards Nairobi. We reached Nairobi and wanted to meet our Facebook friend from Kenya at the local mall (we
have never met her in person) we were excited.

Our tour operator also came to say goodbye. She got us a beautiful souvenir. She was very apologetic about the vehicle incident but it was all unexpected and we had nothing but good memories out of the trip. We told her that we’ll be back for more!

The terrain inside the park is pretty rough and with rain gets very muddy. We have seen a lot of vehicles break down as well so it comes with the experience. Overall we had an amazing time and actually we did not miss any activities as planned so we were very happy with our overall adventure in Kenya!

With our friend Anita at Nairobi airport 

We finally met our friend and ate our last meal in Kenya together. We shared hugs, laugh, and wonderful conversations. Our friend offered to drop us to the airport, and we had more conversations in the car and such an amazing time overall in Kenya.

With all of this in our hearts, it was time to bid farewell to beautiful Kenya. The memories made in the continent of Africa will always be very dear to us. Back from the trip, we feel extremely rejuvenated, fulfilled, and grateful for all the experiences we had along the way.

Henry David Thoreau On Travel and Being Present

Henry David Thoreau was an American essayist, poet, and philosopher. A leading transcendentalist, he is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings.

Below are some of Thoreau’s thoughts on travel and being present in time. We hope you’ll enjoy this selection just as much we enjoyed compiling it for you.

You Don’t Need Money to Travel

One [of my friend] says to me, “I wonder that you do not lay up money [but yet] you love to travel; you might take the cars and go to Fitchburg today and see the country.”

But I am wiser than that. I have learned that the swiftest traveller is he that goes afoot. I say to my friend, suppose we try who will get there first. The distance is 30 miles; the fare 90 cents. That is almost a day’s wages.

Well, I start now on foot, and get there before night; I have travelled at that rate by the week together. You will in the mean while have earned your fare, and arrive there some time tomorrow, or possibly this evening, if you are lucky enough to get a job in season.

Living Deliberately

I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear; nor did I wish to practice resignation, unless it was quite necessary.

I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms, and, if it proved to be mean, why then to get the whole and genuine meanness of it, and publish its meanness to the world; or if it were sublime, to know it by experience, and be able to give a true account of it in my next excursion.

On Wandering in the Wild

Life consists with wildness. The most alive is the wildest. Not yet subdued to man, its presence refreshes him. One who pressed forward incessantly and never rested from his labors, who grew fast and made infinite demands on life, would always find himself in a new country or wilderness, and surrounded by the raw material of life. He would be climbing over the prostrate stems of primitive forest trees.

I wish to speak a word for Nature, for absolute freedom and wildness, as contrasted with a freedom and culture merely civil — to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society.

Our Perception Changes

There is hardly anything that shows the short-sightedness or capriciousness of the imagination more than traveling does. With change of place we change our ideas; nay, our opinions and feelings. We can by an effort, indeed, transport ourselves to old and long-forgotten scenes, and then the picture of the mind revives again; but we forget those that we have just left.

It seems that we can think but of one place at a time. The canvas of the fancy is but of a certain extent, and if we paint one set of objects upon it, they immediately efface every other. We cannot enlarge our conceptions, we only shift our point of view.

The landscape bares its bosom to the enraptured eye; we take our fill of it, and seem as if we could form no other image of beauty or grandeur. We pass on, and think no more of it: the horizon that shuts it from our sight also blots it from our memory like a dream.

In traveling through a wild, barren country, I can form no idea of a woody and cultivated one. It appears to me that all the world must be barren, like what I see of it. In the country, we forget the town, and in town we despise the country.

The Pleasure of Traveling

I have all my life delighted in traveling, though I have never enjoyed that pleasure upon a large scale. Wood, water, wilderness itself had an inexpressible charm for me, and I had a dreamy way of going much farther than I intended, so that unconsciously my return was protracted, and my parents had sometimes serious cause of uneasiness.

On Taking Long Walks in Nature

It is true we are but faint-hearted crusaders, even the walkers, nowadays, who undertake no persevering, never-ending enterprises. Our expeditions are but tours, and come round again at evening to the old hearth-side from which we set out. Half the work is but retracing our steps.

We should go forth on the shortest walk, perchance, in the spirit of undying adventure, never to return—prepared to send back our embalmed hearts only as relics to our desolate kingdoms.

If you are ready to leave father and mother, and brother and sister, and wife and child and friends, and never see them again—if you have paid your debts, and made your will, and settled all your affairs, and are a free man, then you are ready for a walk.

I think that I cannot preserve my health and spirits unless I spend 4 hours a day at least—and it is commonly more than that—sauntering through the woods and over the hills and fields, absolutely free from all worldly engagements.

I, who cannot stay in my chamber for a single day without acquiring some rust, and when sometimes I have stolen forth for a walk at the eleventh hour of four o’clock in the afternoon, too late to redeem the day, when the shades of night were already beginning to be mingled with the daylight, have felt as if I had committed some sin to be atoned for,—I confess that I am astonished at the power of endurance, to say nothing of the moral insensibility, of my neighbors who confine themselves to shops and offices the whole day for weeks and months, ay, and years almost together.

The New World

Sir Francis Head, an English traveller and a Governor-General of Canada, tells us that:

“In both the northern and southern hemispheres of the New World, Nature has not only outlined her words on a larger scale, but has painted the whole picture with brighter and more costly colors than she used in delineating and in beautifying the Old World. The heavens of America appear infinitely higher, the sky is bluer, the air is fresher, the cold is intenser, the moon looks larger, the stars are brighter, the thunder is louder, the lightning is vivider, the wind is stronger, the rain is heavier, the mountains are higher, the rivers longer, the forests bigger, the plains broader.”

The Joy of Nothingness

Sometimes, in a summer morning, having taken my accustomed bath, I sat in my sunny doorway from sunrise till noon, rapt in a revery, amidst the pines and hickories and sumachs, in undisturbed solitude and stillness, while the birds sing around or flitted noiseless through the house, until by the sun falling in at my west window, or the noise of some traveller’s wagon on the distant highway, I was reminded of the lapse of time.

I grew in those seasons like corn in the night, and they were far better than any work of the hands would have been. They were not time subtracted from my life, but so much over and above my usual allowance.

I realized what the Orientals mean by contemplation and the forsaking of works. For the most part, I minded not how the hours went. The day advanced as if to light some work of mine; it was morning, and lo, now it is evening, and nothing memorable is accomplished.

The Cost of Anything

The cost of a thing is the amount of what I will call life which is required to be exchanged for it, immediately or in the long run.

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The Ultimate Guide to US National Parks Road Trips Across America

If you are like us, chances are you love road trips and you want to visit all the National Parks in the United States. But, the United States is a vast landmass and if you work a full-time job or run a business, you have limited vacation days. Plus, traveling requires planning and money.

In 2019, we finished our quest to visit all 50 US States as “the First non-US born Couple”. During our 5 years long adventure, we made numerous road trips, drove more than 15,000 miles, visited more than 100 US Cities, and explore over 30 National Parks.

We thought, sharing our journey will be a helpful resource for other wanderlusters who are planning a similar adventure.

Death Valley National Park, Nevada

US National Parks Road Trips

Before we jump into the best ways to visit the America’s National Parks and various google maps routes, let’s take a quick step back and reorient ourselves on what is our goal here.

The goal here is to visit most (if not all) of the US National Parks.

There are 61 National Parks in the United States. If you’ll try to drive to all of them in one stretch, it will be more than 15,000 miles of driving and it will easily take you over 3 months. But, we are not going to propose that. Enjoying nature is opposite of rushing!

Therefore, the purpose of this guide is to help you save money and time while enjoying the beauty of the North American continent. It’s not a record making or breaking quest, it’s a carefully thought-out itinerary for anyone who has a busy life and day-to-day responsibilities. Jobs, businesses, family, health concerns, and so on.

Depending on where you live or if you are flying from abroad, you can start anywhere (on any of the loops) and then make your way towards Eastcoast, Westcoast, Midwest, or the South.

West Coast National Parks Road Trips Itinerary

Since California has the most National Parks in the contiguous United States, let’s start here.

Below is the trip we planned for ourselves along with our friends who live in the San Jose area. Please note, we live in Boston (on the opposite coast) and the tickets to San Francisco is usually the cheapest among all California airports. So, we made San Fransisco as our start and end point.

Depending on where you are coming from or if you happen to live in California or Oregon, you can tweak the journey to your liking and whatever best suits your situation.

California National Parks Road Trip Itinerary

Since California has 8 National Parks and it’s one of the largest state, this loop only consists of California National Parks.

Link to open in Google Maps

Yosemite National Park, California

Pacific North-West National Parks Road Trip Itinerary

This loop includes the States of Washington and Oregon on the west-coast, and the states of Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana.

We flew to Seattle from Boston and started south. Portland city should not be missed and there are plenty of scenery near Bend so we added those as out stops. Crater Lake National Park is a short drive from Bend.

Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

In Idaho, we made Boise our night stops and Idaho Falls as a stop for Grand Teton National Park.

Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

From the Grand Teton, you head directly north into the Yellowstone National Park and you should give it at least 2 days. There is just too much to see here. Also, note that in terms of the size, Yellowstone is larger than the state of Delaware and Rhode Island combined.

Continuing north, we passed through Choteau and made East Glacier village our pit stop for entry into the Montana’s crown, Glacier National Park. Again, the weather is unpredictable and allow yourself a few extra days so you don’t miss the breathtaking beauty of many green, blue, and turquoise colored glacier-fed lakes.

Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

After that, you can head west and if you want you can explore Spokane on your way. Continue further west to North Cascades National Park, then head south to Seattle. Then explore Olympic National Park and Rainer National Parks.

Visit the Space Needle and the famous fish and farmers marker – Pike Place.

Link to open in Google Maps

Links to open in Google Maps

The above two loops (California loop and Pacific Northwest loop) covers 15 National Parks out of 61 total. Woohoo! You are off to a great start.

You have already achieved almost 25% of your goal.

Denver National Parks Road Trip

We flew from Boston to Denver and this time our eyes were set on the magnificent beauty of Colorado’s Rockies and the reddish desert of Utah.

Link to open in Google Maps

Stone Arch in Arches National Park, Utah

Las Vegas National Parks Road Trip

Next, we flew to Las Vegas from Boston (the tickets are usually cheap to Vegas from almost anywhere in the United States). This time, we focused on the great Canyons of Arizona and the remaining wonders of Utah, including Westworld’s Monument Valley.

Link to open in Google Maps

The above two loops gives 12 National Parks which brings your totals to 27/61. This is getting exciting, isn’t it! You have just made 4 trips from your home base (wherever it may be) and you are already 44% done towards your milestone!

The Narrows in Zion National Park, Utah

Minneapolis National Parks Road Trip

This time we flew from Boston to Minneapolis as the tickets are again usually cheap and it’s the biggest airport for the next 5 National Parks road trip loop.

Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota is the best place to see wild bisons and wild horses. Whereas Wind Cave and Badlands in South Dakota is a unique geographical wonders.

Bisons in Wind Cave National Park, South Dakota

Minneapolis and Michigan bordering with Canada and surrounded by the Great Lakes is amazing during the summer time.

Link to open in Google Maps

Talk about driving across the entire country from the comfort of your own rental car or RV. After making this 5th trip, you are more than halfway done. Your totals after visiting the above 5 National Parks now stand at 32/61.

Badlands National Park, South Dakota

You have now visited more than half of all National Parks in the United States. Congratulations! 

Let’s shift gears and head to the South now for a long road trip before we continue our journey into the Midwest and Northeast and Atlantic South.

Phoenix or Albuquerque National Parks Road Trip

This last trip will wrap up everything in the South, Pacific Northwest, the Rockies, and the West Coast. And you have two choices in terms of where you want to start and finish your road trip: Phoenix, Arizona or Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Depending on whether you are flying in or driving and whichever city seems to be nearer and cheaper, you can pick either one and do this loop. You have 5 National Parks to cover in this trip:

Petrified Forest National Park, Saguaro National Park, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, Guadalupe Mountains National Park, and Big Bend National Park. Two in Arizona, one in New Mexico, and two in Texas. (If you wondering where is Grand Canyon, scroll above to Las Vegas National Parks Road Trip loop.)

Link to open in Google Maps

You have now 37 national parks out of 61 total. 😉 Talk about wandering around!

The Big St. Louis National Parks Road Trip Loop

The goal of this big road trip is to finish everything remaining except the National Parks of Alaska (eight), Hawaii (two), Florida (three), and Maine (one). By doing this almost 3500 miles long loop, you’ll end up with 47 National Parks out of 61 total.

Now, that’s almost near-80% finished! And, you are just 4 trips away from finishing your adventure.

Link to open in Google Maps

In the above loop, you have got two newest National Parks of the United States, the St. Louis Gateway Arch and Indiana Dunes in Indiana. On this trip, you’ll also pass through great cities such as St. Louis, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Atlanta, and Memphis.

Florida National Parks

Florida has three National Parks. Everyone has heard of Everglades National Park and the gators but did you know, Florida also has two marine area that are protected National Parks: Biscayne and Dry Tortugas.

Alligator in Everglades National Park, Florida

You can fly to Miami and then rent a car and drive to Everglades. Then drive back to Miami and then drive to Biscayne National Park. In the end, head to the Key West and explore Dry Tortugas National Park.

Now you are “50 National Parks visited” kind of person.

Acadia National Park, Maine

Jordan Pond in Acadia National Park, Maine

For your 51st National Park, fly to Boston or Portland, Maine and then drive to Bar Harbor, Maine and enjoy the scenic beauty of Acadia National Park. It’s amazing during the Fall colors.

Since we live in Boston, we have been to Acadia numerous times and in all seasons. Maine has a beautiful coastline and Acadia is the crown jewel.

Woohoo! Congratulations! You have just finished 51/61 and all of the National Parks in the Contiguous United States.

You can pat on your back and take a moment to allow yourself to celebrate. This is quite a milestone! Not many people have seen this beautiful country coast-to-coast and you are among the lucky few!

Alaska National Parks

Fly to Anchorage and rent a car and visit the four national parks near the Anchorage region. These are: Lake Clark National Park, Katmai National Park, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, and Kenai Fjords National Park.

Then head south to Juneau, Alaska to visit Glacier Bay National Park. It’s accessible only by ship or plane.

Next, head north to Denali National Park and then continue further north to the Gates of the Arctic National Park. Upon return, either from Fairbanks or Anchorage, you may want to take a flight to the last remaining national park in Alaska, Kobuk Valley National Park.

Denali National Park, Alaska

Hawaii National Parks

What could be a better a place to finish this epic adventure than in Hawaii. Hawaii was the 50th state of the US and it has 4 major islands that everyone visits to: Oahu, Big Island, Maui, and Kauai.

For the National Parks adventure, you’ll be visiting Maui and the Big Island (also called as Hawaii). In Maui, you have Haleakala National Park, and on the Big Island, you have Hawaii’s Volcanoes National Park.

Congratulations once again, now you have visited all 61 US National Parks! 

If you are wondering what’s next, check out our Ultimate Travel Bucket List page to start new adventures!

Note: The cover photo is of Yellowstone National Park, our favorite national park along with Hawaii’s Volcanoes National Park.

7 of the Most Unique Places to Visit in Australia

Australia is full of exciting things! It’s true, there is nowhere else quite like Australia, the only country that has a whole continent to itself. This amazing country has it all, vibrant cosmopolitan cities, stunning scenery, the crazy outback and more.

But what if you’ve done the traditional stuff and you’re looking for something a little off the wall?

Well, Australia has plenty of that too. Check out one or more of these awesome, unusual, and unique destinations for something
a little different and adventurous! After all, you are in Oz, the Down Under!

1. Coober Pedy

If it’s weird you’re looking for the town of Coober Pedy; don’t worry, it is right up your street. This remote town is located roughly 6-8 hours drive from Port Augusta with almost nothing in between. making it one of the most remote towns in Australia.

Coober Pedy was originally built as a settlement for miners working in the local opal mine. But today it is one of Australia’s most popular tourist destinations. Blisteringly hot during the day, most of the houses are built underground to shelter from the intense heat.

This gives the town an almost futuristic feel as though you’ve just been transported onto the set of the latest Star Wars movie.

If that’s not enough, there is also a golf course, although it’s not like any golf course you’ve seen before. There is no grass and it can only be played at night when it’s cool enough.

Fun Fact: There are other weird things to see here too. As you enter the town you’ll pass a soul tree made from scrap metal, there’s a house in town decorated in women’s underwear and the world’s only underground gaming room is also located here.

The land surrounding the settlement is also pretty unique.

An hour’s drive away is the dystopian landscape of Moon Plains which was used in the films Mad Max 3 and Priscilla Queen of the Desert.

2. Devils Marbles

The Devils Marbles are certainly one of the strangest things to see in the Northern Territories. Essentially they are just a pile of rocks stacked on top of each other in the desert. But they are not man-made, they were formed by millions of years of wind erosion to form a unique piece of natural sculpture.

The Devils Marbles are conveniently located close to Darwin, making them the perfect stopping off point if you are heading from Alice Springs to Darwin or Adelaide to Darwin.

The best time to visit is sunset when you’ll capture some truly breathtaking photos as the stones change color in the setting sun.

3. Great Ocean Road

Well, not really a hidden gem (since it’s popular all over the world) but is it unique? Definitely so.

The Great Ocean Road is one of the world’s great scenic drives. Not just that, it’s a major coastal highway in the South West Coast region of Victoria, Australia.

Note that none of the other states of Australia do not have their coastal roads as well situated as this one – with either the views, the access, or the length and variety of environments.

To travel from Melbourne along this route is an experience that has a lasting impact on most travelers.

4. Squeaky Beach

Located in Victoria, Wilson’s Promontory National Park is home to Squeaky Beach. As its name would suggest, is a sandy beach which squeaks underfoot. Think about that! Or better yet, close your eyes and imagine!

The unique sound is created by rounded grains of quartz in the sand which makes a squeaking sound when they rub together. Walking on the beach is a truly unique experience and one you won’t be able to recreate anywhere else.

Squeaky Beach is located in Victoria around 3 hrs drive from Melbourne.

It is best to visit by car because there are no direct train or bus services. However, you could take the train from Melbourne to Morwell and then grab a taxi to Squeaky Beach. The journey should take no more than 3.5 hrs.

5. Uluru and Kata Tjuta

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park is a park in the southern portion of the Northern Territory of Australia, part of the so-called Red Centre of the continent. The National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage area. It is best known for Uluru, a single massive rock formation, and also for Kata Tjuta (“the Olgas”), a range of rock domes.

Note: Visitors should note that the National Park contains both the Uluru Rock and Kata Tjuta. The park closes at night has few services and no accommodation or camping. Yulara is the resort town that contains all the services for the area.

Uluru and Kata Tjuta are considered sacred places by the Aboriginies. The land is owned by the Anangu, leased by the government, and jointly managed by the Anangu tribe and the Australian parks and management services.

Visitors will notice efforts throughout the area to include and encourage respect for the Anangu perspective on the land.

Much of Kata Tjuta is off-limits, for example, and climbing Uluru is strongly discouraged by sign-posts. Also, please note that climbing Uluru will be no longer allowed from October 2019.

6. Hahndorf

Hahndorf is a little piece of Germany in the Adelaide Hills. Founded by German immigrants in 1839 the town looks and feels like a traditional German settlement transplanted from Bavaria.

There are German cafes serving traditional German food, the main street is lined with German-themed shops and you can even sample some locally produced Riesling.

Hahndorf is pretty unique and not all that well known, so you will surely have some stories to tell when you get back home. The town is located just a short distance from Adelaide along the Metro 864 bus route.

The local light rail system also passes through the town so unlike the other attractions on this list, it’s pretty easy to get to.

7. The Pinnacles

Located in the Nambung National Park; the Pinnacles were virtually unknown until 1967 but are one of Western Australia’s most visited attractions today. Formed by the fragments of seashells millions of years ago, there is still some debate about how these natural rock creations came to be located here.

Getting to the Pinnacles is pretty easy, they are located approximately 2.5 hrs drive from Perth along the beautiful Indian Ocean Drive. The nearest town is Cervantes which is famous for its delicious lobster and seafood dishes making it the perfect place to stop for lunch.

The best time to visit is between July and October when you’ll get to enjoy the local landscape filled with the blooms of spring.

Pro-Tip

So if you’re looking for something a little out of the ordinary, these can be few of the unique places to visit (other than the Sydney region and the Great Barrier Reef), which everyone goes to (and you should too).

What we are trying to say is Australia has no shortage of unique and other-worldly spots. But a quick word of warning, venturing into the bush is not for the fainthearted, so it is wise to ensure you have an adequate travel insurance policy in place before you set off.

A good travel insurance will not only provide cover if one of your party becomes sick or injured but it will also cover your rental vehicle excess. When traveling internationally, having travel insurance will allow you to enjoy your holiday without having to worry about any unforeseen bills.

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A Travel Guide To Sahara Desert With 8 Pro Tips

The Sahara Desert has always been a center of attraction for the tourist who visits Morocco. It is impossible to resist the beauty of orange sand around you.

You could feel the ancient culture of Morocco by riding the Camel in the Sahara. I bet when you ride camel you would feel like Aladdin searching for Jasmine!

Note: You may think (based on the movies or books) that Sahara is just about riding a camel or walking barefoot in the sand. Let me tell you, it’s much more than that. Also, I will share some really interesting ideas which you can do in Sahara and make your trip more memorable.

Must-Do Things In The Sahara Desert

The beauty of Sahara is very unique and it is different from many pieces of nature that you have ever seen in your life.

To experience the place where there is no civilization, no buildings and no signs of footprints because the sand will cover your footprint is a treat in itself. In this short guide, I will give you some tips to enjoy your Sahara tour to the fullest.

A native desert girl

Camel Trekking

Many people think that camel riding is a very tiring and uncomfortable thing but most of them do not know that in the evenings they are padded with blankets and supplies. You could easily ride and enjoy the journey in the evening.

Have fun with Sand boards

Sand boards will be provided by your hotel. Ask the staff they will give you the sand boards to enjoy. If you are with family, they will give separate boards to kids. What you can do is slide down the dune.

Look for highest dunes with good slopes and you will have a time of your life. Trust me!

Enjoy the beauty of Sahara

Most people waste a lot of time taking pictures of different places. I recommend enjoying the tour fully. See the beauty around you with your own eyes, not by the eyes of the camera.

Sitting alone outside of your camp and gazing the sky full of stars is an experience which you will never forget.

Watch Sunrise & Sunsets from the sand dunes

Wake up early and see the sunrise. See how the sun rays turn the sand into Golden. You could find orange sand dunes in the western part of the Sahara near Morocco.

Marrakech is very popular because of its Sahara Desert Tours. If you want to enjoy a 3 days desert tour from Marrakech then follow the link as they offer some really good tour deals to the Sahara Desert.

Go on a desert safari

Similar to camel tours and walking tours, you can also do a desert safari. These desert safari drivers (a 4×4 jeep or other SUVs) are experienced and you’ll have one thrilling experience of a lifetime. It’s a ‘must try’.

Set up a desert tent

No trip to the Sahara is complete without having spent a night in the desert in an open (or covered) tent while laying down directly under the night sky and cold sand.

All of the above can be either self-organized or booked as a tour.

Do not rush

Enjoy the trip in its deepest sense. A lot of people try to explore the Sahara Desert very quickly and when their time gets over, they usually said they did not explore even half of the desert. You must plan your desert tour for at least 3 days.

8 Pro Tips Before You Embark on the Sahara Adventure

Before you go to Sahara make sure you should know what to pack and I will show you the necessary item which you should not leave behind. Leaving these would cause unnecessary pain in the Sahara. So, without further ado here is the list.

Don’t forget sunglasses

This is the most obvious thing to pack because there would be strong UV rays which can damage and may even burn your eye’s soft tissues. According to the American Optometric Association if you do not wear sunglasses in that kind of area where the sun is at its peak then you risk of macular degeneration.

As a bonus, glasses will also protect your eyes from any sand that might get into your eyes with the breeze.

Sun protection

Speaking of strong and hot sun, do not forget to bring sunscreen. Moreover, wear full sleeve shirts to protect your arm and wear a hat is also highly advised to protect you from sunstroke.

Carrying a water bottle is also highly recommended because when you ride the camel you will dehydrate very quickly.

Wear comfortable shoes

You might watch in the old movies like in Aladdin in Lawrence of Arabia where the main protagonist walks in Sahara with no shoes or in sandals. But please do not make this stupid mistake in the afternoon when the sun heats up the sand becomes very hot.

Believe me, you do not want to be out in the dunes without proper protection for your feet. If you are with some good travel company, they may provide you with some extra pair of shoes which you can use in your desert excursion.

Pro Tip: You will get a chance to walk bare feet on the sand in the morning and evenings when the sand is cool.

Magnificent desert sunset in the Sahara

Carry a light scarf

You should buy a scarf before going to Sahara. It will help you when you are going to sleep outside of your camp at night.

Although most of the times you should not have to worry about the sandstorms if there is a little wind, you could cover your face with the scarf

Pack a jacket

Many people thought that Sahara would be very hot then why should we buy jackets? You should know that Sahara will not be hot every time. It would be cold in the mornings and evenings.

If you are coming in winter then you should definitely pack a pair of jackets with you.

Carry a chapstick

The air in the Sahara is very dry and will take a toll on your lips for sure. Couple of time I have seen men wearing their wife’s lipstick to keep their lips from peeling.

So, protect yourself from this kind of embarrassing situation and keep lip balm or Chapstick with you.

Pack a great camera

Sahara is considered as a heaven for photographers. There is an unlimited number of interesting photos in Sahara like sunrise, changing colors of sand dunes in the morning, sunset, Camel riding, Clear sky with thousands of stars, etc.

If you bring digital Camera then I recommend bringing its bag to protect it from dust also do not forget to bring its batteries or charger.

Book your tour with a credible travel agency

My final tip would be to book your Sahara Tour with some credible travel agency. Last year before going to the Sahara Desert, I have found that there are a plethora of travel companies out there making false claims.

You should book your extrusion with some specialists and with locals who knew the place very well.

I booked my Sahara trip with Marrakech Desert Trips. I have found them very professional and they guided me very professionally throughout my trip. They told me the accurate expenses before and did not charge me with any extra dime.

Best Time To Visit The Sahara Desert

A morning walking tour exploring the sand dunes

Sahara is open for almost all year. You could plan the tour any time any day. But according to me, the best time is from October to early May. During these months’ temperatures would be not that much as in June to September.

You may encounter some sandstorms in January to April but they are just mild sandstorms and you could easily get away with them by putting the light scarf as I mentioned above and you would be fine.

Author Bio

Sheraz Shahzad is a part-time travel blogger, part-time digital marketing specialist, and full-time dreamer. He loves the photographic medium for expressing what he loves about life. He always finds himself lost during travel.

Aside from his taste for adventure, he loves doing two things while traveling: meeting new friends and trying new food. You can contact him on LinkedIn to work on your travel website.

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The Best Month To Cruise To Antarctica

Oh! when the summer arrives, Antarctica sounds divine, doesn’t it? The summer months and early winter months mark as a travel season for most of the North Americans and Europeans. Many fly halfway across the globe to visit their dream destinations.

If you are planning to visit Antarctica, why fly and spend big bucks when you can immerse yourself in the excitement of an Antartica cruise! Antarctica might be the coldest and the driest, but it is also the queen of polar expeditions.

So, when you get a chance to ditch all the regular tour packages and embark on a polar voyage, why not take it?

Visit in November

Golden sunset in Antarctica

Traveling to Antarctica is not all flowers and the sunshine. That is why most of the travelers tend to visit during the summer months.

But we recommend that you travel in winter. Since Antartica is in the southern hemisphere, it means the months of November and December are warmer while the northern hemis[here begins to get chilly.

Spring Scenery

The Austral Spring is already on the go and you can see the sights that you will seldom see if you take the cruise at any other time of the year.

Emperor penguins 

You see the cute penguins following the courtship rituals, humpback whales feeding on the zooplankton, Crab-eating Seals guarding their younger ones and Southern Elephants on the watchdog duty.

It is only at this time of the year that the entire Antarctic habitat decides to unveil itself.

White Christmas

It is not just the animal habitat that is in its ultimate glory. The white sheet of icebergs shine and glow with the nests of various animals. It is the best time to capture the unadulterated magic of the Southern Pole.

Antartic scenery  

The Hurtigruten Way

Hurtigruten is an age-old cruising company, based in Norway. Instead of flying, you can cruise along in the expertly designed ships and see the frozen beauty of Antarctica up close.

There are many cruise packages that Hurtigruten offers. And that includes three of its leading ships – MS Fram, MS Roald Amundsen, and MS Midnatsol.

MS Fram

  • No of Cruises available – 8
  • Short trips – 5

MS Fram is a trendsetter in the line of adventure travel ships. It offers five short voyages to Antarctica. It’s usually a two-week voyage from Ushuaia. Argentina through the mysterious Drake Passage.

They also have tours in January-February, but it’s more expensive than November. We recommend traveling in November when the price is lower, and the sights are gorgeous.

But the golden deal is in October. It is just the time when the Antarctic ice starts melting and you can see the polar wildlife come out of their hiding. MS Fram departs from Montevideo, Uruguay in South America.

Another season package is available in February, where you get to see the beautiful Chile Coast. As we said earlier the price tag during January – February goes a notch higher.

A golden sunset in Antarctica

MS Midnatsol

  • No of Cruises available – 9
  • Short trips – 9

MS Midnatsol offers shorter voyages than the other two ships. And it gives a luxurious experience even in the remotest of locations. You get a Jacuzzi and a sun deck in the freezing poles, isn’t that exciting?

All the itineraries of MS Midnatsol are short and swanky. The ship offers a two week trip in November and a few trips in February.

If you really want to celebrate White Christmas, then MS Midnatsol does offer a Christmas voyage each year. A two-week adventure trip to Antarctica is the best way to finish strong and start your new year!

If you are interested in seeing the Chilean Fjords or touching the icebergs or if you want to enjoy the views of the Patagonian Coast- then check out MS Midnatsol tours.

Hiking on the slippery ice might sound tempting and MS Midnatsol makes it possible. You can go on circling and enjoying the beauty of the South American coast and may even visit the Falkland Islands.

Light reflecting through frozen polar ice

MS Roald Amundsen

  • No of Cruises available – 3
  • Short trips – 2

This brand new addition to the fleet of Hurtigruten is MS Roald Amundsen. It defines sustainable travel to perfection. It uses modern technology in an environment-friendly design which is commendable.

There are number voyages of MS Roald Amundsen to Antarctica each year. Usually, the tours span to 18- 19 days and are far pricier than the other ships. But as we mentioned earlier, you can’t go wrong on any of these ships!

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6 Best Long Hiking Trails Around The World

The lofty heights of mountains call onto our inner wanderer. We think, what ways lead the wind through that green forest, or what awaits at the top of that snow-capped mountain?

But we cannot sit and wait for getting our answers, can we? We need to pack up and get on our feet!

Below are 6 of the best hiking trails (around the world) that must make it to your bucket list.

KILIMANJARO

It is not a joke to mention Africa’s highest mountain in the top of the list. This 35 miles long hiking trail will lead you to the peak of Kilimanjaro.

Related: Kilimanjaro Travel Guide

With a tour guide, you can complete the hike in 7- 10 days. But if you want to do it by yourself, then you need careful planning. There are alternative routes which will take you to the destination faster.

Then Viola! You see the starry sky unfolding before you.

Read Next: How to Climb Mt. Kilimanjaro: Rules of Success

EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK

We included this in our list because it involves the highest mountain in the world. You will be filled with awe once you just have a glimpse of the tip. A 3-weeks trip will do, to make you climb the heights.

Related: Trekking in Nepal: The Complete Guide

You can fly to Nepal during September to November. During this time the cold doesn’t hit in full force so that you can enjoy your cultural as well as historical hike.

GRAND CANYON

Grand Canyon is one of the largest geographical features of the surface of the Earth. You can know the power of its sheer magnificence by the views it grants you.

Hiking from rim to rim will just take a week. But in that time, this 44 miles long hiking trail will offer you some of the best sceneries (that you can ever get on a long hike).

APPALACHIAN TRAIL

A 2180-miles of beauty and mountains is an adventure you will not want to miss. But hiking from Georgia to Maine is not for beginners with limited energy. You should undertake this task, if and only if you are passionate about it.

Completing this journey takes around three to six months depending on your fitness level and pace.

If you do not have that kind of time to dedicate, then you can do the Appalachian trail in smaller sections. There are several shorter and interesting trails within the Appalachian that will equally thrill your senses.

KUNGSLEDEN

When we said about the snow-topped mountains we did not joke. Sweden abounds in the frozen landscape; you can have a look at the beauteous landscape.

It is 275-miles long hike. Hence it will neither take much of your time nor energy. From icy glaciers to alpine vegetation, you will see everything that makes Sweden the dream destination of many.

It does not end here; you will get to see Mount Kebnekaise (the highest peak in the country).

TONQUIN VALLEY

Those looking for short trails are in luck. This Canadian trail in Alberta became viral when Ansel Adams posted photos of it online. From then on, it is on the bucket list of many.

Hiking the Valley takes a week. But you will have to struggle a bit to reach this place. Yes, its accessibility might not be up to the mark, but the scenic charms it exhibits will leave you spellbound.

201 Greatest Travel Quotes for Travel Inspiration

Enjoy some of the greatest travel quotes and allow yourself to be seduced by the spirit of wanderlust and vivid imaginations of adventures in far and distant lands.

Each quote will gently guide you to listen closely to your own heart.

201 Greatest Travel Quotes

1) “Bury me where I die.” ― Jane Bulos

2) “Travelers are dreamers who make their desires for adventure a reality.” – Anonymous

3) “When something good happens, travel to celebrate. If something bad happens, travel to forget. If nothing happens, travel to make something happen.” – Anonymous

4) “The Travel impulse is a mental and a physical curiosity. It is a passion. And I can’t understand people who don’t want to travel.” – Paul Theroux

Photo: The Art of Travel Partners

5) “Some of us just need more Vitamin Sea.” – Salil Jha

6) “To travel is to evolve.” – Pierre Bernardo

7) “This heart of mine was made to travel the world.” – Anonymous

8) “I travel because I become uncomfortable being too comfortable.” – Carew Papritz

9) “My goal is to run out of pages in my passport.” – Anonymous

10) “To live will be an awfully big adventure.” – Peter Pan

11) “The traveler’s rush that hits you upon arrival to a new place is like a drug. And like a drug, the more you expose yourself to it, the more you want it.” – Clayton B Cornell

12) “My passport is screaming to be stamped.” – Cherie Oke

13) “This is your planet; you should really come see it sometime.” – Anonymous

14) “My favorite thing is to go where I’ve never been.” – Diane Arbus

15) “Travel is my therapy.” – Anonymous

16) “We travel, some of us, forever to seek other places, other lives and other souls.” – Anais Nin

17) “I travel because seeing photos in books and brochures wasn’t good enough for me. To be there was everything.” – Wiremu Ratcliffe

18) “If traveling was free, you would never see me again.” – Anonymous

19) “A traveler is active; he goes strenuously in search of people, of adventure, of experience. The tourist is passive; he expects interesting things to happen to him. He goes “sightseeing”.”  – Daniel J. Boorstin

20) “I depart, whither I know not; but the hour’s gone by when Albion’s lessening shores could grieve or glad mine eye.” – Lord Byron

Photo: The Art of Travel Partners

Related: The Ultimate Travel Bucket List

21) “Travel brings power and love back to your life.” – Rumi

22) “In traveling, I shape myself betimes to idleness and take fools’ pleasure.” – George Eliot

23) “I have been a stranger in a strange land.” – Exodus 2:22

24) “Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less traveled by and that has made all the difference.” ― Robert Frost

25) “The man journeyed far, and he heard and saw many strange things on his travels. He learned that – the friend and the enemy are but two faces of the same self. That the path one believes chosen long since, constant and unchangeable, straight and wide, can alter in an instant. Can branch, and twist and lead the traveler to places far beyond his wildest imaginings. That there are mysteries beyond the mind of mortal man, and that to deny their existence is to spend a life of half-consciousness.” ― Juliet Marillier

26) “Not all those who wander are lost.” ― J.R.R. Tolkien

27) “I love to escape to wild places – forests, mountains, rivers or the sea. If that’s not possible, I flee into books; vicarious travel is rejuvenating.” ― Jane Wilson-Howarth

28) “Foolish acts and bold adventures almost always appear, especially in the beginning, to be the absolute same thing.” ― Leigh Ann Henion

29) “As you travel along the roads in life, there is a certain kind of peace that comes with knowing you’re on the right path. And when you are faced with adversity, it challenges you but makes you stronger. The road is not always an easy route. Nevertheless, you must not allow your fears to keep you from reaching the destination.” ― Amaka Imani Nkosazana

30) “I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.” ― Robert Louis Stevenson

Photo: The Art of Travel Partners

31) “Little by little, one travels far.” ― J.R.R. Tolkien

32) “Let your life reveal its lessons. Follow your heart, as it will not lead you astray. Find your passion and let its energy run through you in ways you have never experienced. With that, your real life will begin.” ― Angela Bushman

33) “Our homes travel with us. They are wherever we feel loved and accepted.” ― Kamand Kojouri

34) “As is often the case when I travel, my vulnerability — like not knowing what the hell I’m going to do upon arrival — makes me more open to outside interactions than I might be when I’m at home and think I know best what needs to be done. On the road, serendipity is given space to enter my life.” ― Andrew McCarthy

35) “You are only given one life, one chance at fully living it…take risks, believe in your dreams, explore the world and her people, live out loud!” ― Danell Lynn

36) “Travel is rebellion in its purest form. We follow our heart. We free ourselves of labels. We lose control willingly. We love the unfamiliar. We trust strangers. We own only what we can carry. We search for better questions, not answers. We truly graduate. And, sometimes, we choose never to come back.” ― Anonymous

37) “Not all journeys seek an end. Some are their own purpose.” ― Una McCormack

38) “I’d learned so much from traveling to familiar places that I figured I’d learn twice as much by going to a place I knew nothing about.” ― Gerry Abbey

39) “We are the roads we travel. The choices we make are everything.” ― Megan Duke

40) “There are those who travel but never really arrive. Those who visit a place but never know the people. Travel is so much more when you get closer to life and how it is lived here, wherever here may be. I am moving into the unknown to come into being at home wherever I find myself. Individually, inspired, and imaginative.” ― Anna Asche

Related: 101 Couple Goals

Photo: The Art of Travel Partners

41) “I Travel a lot; I hate having my life disrupted by routine.” ― C. Stinnett

42) “Travel far enough, you meet yourself.” ― David Mitchell

43) “We should not judge people by their peak of excellence, but by the distance they have traveled from the point where they started.” ― Henry Ward Beecher

44) “I was an adventurer, but she was not an adventuress. She was a ‘wanderess’. Thus, she didn’t care about money, only experiences – whether they came from wealth or from poverty, it was all the same to her.” ― Roman Payne

45) “Chaos is more freedom; in fact, total freedom. But no meaning. I want to be free to act, and I also want my actions to mean something.” ― Audrey Niffenegger

46) “Never did the world make a queen of a girl who hides in houses and dreams without traveling.” ― Roman Payne

47) “Travel is never a matter of money but of courage.” ― Paulo Coelho

48) “By hook or by crook, I hope that you will possess yourselves of money enough to travel and to idle, to contemplate the future or the past of the world, to dream over books and loiter at street corners and let the line of thought dip deep into the stream.” ― Virginia Woolf

49) “Make voyages. Attempt them. There’s nothing else.” ― Tennessee Williams

50) “I’m inspired by the people I meet in my travels–hearing their stories, seeing the hardships they overcome, their fundamental optimism and decency. I’m inspired by the love people have for their children. And I’m inspired by my own children, how full they make my heart. They make me want to work to make the world a little bit better. And they make me want to be a better man.” ― Barack Obama

51) “We travel, initially, to lose ourselves; and we travel, next to find ourselves. We travel to open our hearts and eyes and learn more about the world than our newspapers will accommodate. We travel to bring what little we can, in our ignorance and knowledge, to those parts of the globe whose riches are differently dispersed. And we travel, in essence, to become young fools again- to slow time down and get taken in, and fall in love once more.” ― Pico Iyer

52) “Freedom is a heavy load, a great and strange burden for the spirit to undertake. It is not easy. It is not a gift given, but a choice made, and the choice may be a hard one. The road goes upward towards the light, but the laden traveler may never reach the end of it.” ― Ursula K. Le Guin

53) “Be fearless. Have the courage to take risks. Go where there are no guarantees. Get out of your comfort zone even if it means being uncomfortable. The road less traveled is sometimes fraught with barricades bumps and uncharted terrain. But it is on that road where your characters is truly tested and have the courage to accept that you’re not perfect nothing is and no one is — and that’s OK.” ― Katie Couric

54) “There ain’t no journey what don’t change you some.” ― David Mitchell

55) “Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there–on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.” ― Carl Sagan

56) “Each of us has the right and the responsibility to assess the roads which lie ahead and those over which we have traveled, and if the future road looms ominous or unpromising, and the roads back uninviting, then we need to gather our resolve and, carrying only the necessary baggage, step off that road into another direction. If the new choice is also unpalatable, without embarrassment, we must be ready to change that as well.” ― Maya Angelou

57) “Life is simple. Open your heart, mind, and arms to new things and people, we are united in our differences. Ask the next person you see what their passion is and share your inspiring dream with them. Travel often; getting lost will help you find yourself. Some opportunities only come once, seize them. Life is about the people you meet and the things you create with them, so go out and start creating. Life is short, live your dream and wear your passion.” ― Holstee Manifesto

Photo: The Art of Travel Partners

58) “As for you girls, you must risk everything for Freedom, and give everything for Passion, loving everything that your hearts and your bodies love. The only thing higher for a girl and more sacred for a young woman than her freedom and her passion should be her desire to make her life into poetry, surrendering everything she has to create a life as beautiful as the dreams that dance in her imagination.” ― Roman Payne

59) “Another year is fast approaching. Go be that starving artist you’re afraid to be. Open up that journal and get poetic finally. Volunteer. Suck it up and travel. You were not born here to work and pay taxes. You were put here to be part of a vast organism to explore and create. Stop putting it off. The world has much more to offer than what’s on 15 televisions at TGI Fridays. Take pictures. Scare people. Shake up the scene. Be the change you want to see in the world.” ― Jason Mraz

60) “The very basic core of a man’s living spirit is his passion for adventure. The joy of life comes from our encounters with new experiences, and hence there is no greater joy than to have an endlessly changing horizon, for each day to have a new and different sun.” ― Christopher McCandless

61) “Although time seems to fly, it never travels faster than one day at a time. Each day is a new opportunity to live your life to the fullest. In each waking day, you will find scores of blessings and opportunities for positive change. Do not let your TODAY be stolen by the unchangeable past or the indefinite future! Today is a new day!” ― Steve Maraboli

62) “There are several ways to react to being lost. One is to panic: this was usually Valentina’s first impulse. Another is to abandon yourself to lostness, to allow the fact that you’ve misplaced yourself to change the way you experience the world.” ― Audrey Niffenegger

63) “It turned out this man worked for the Dalai Lama. And she said gently-that they believe when a lot of things start going wrong all at once, it is to protect something big and lovely that is trying to get itself born-and that this something needs for you to be distracted so that it can be born as perfectly as possible.” ― Anne Lamott

64) “No man is brave that has never walked a hundred miles. If you want to know the truth of who you are, walk until not a person knows your name. Travel is the great leveler, the great teacher, bitter as medicine, crueler than mirror-glass. A long stretch of road will teach you more about yourself than a hundred years of quiet.” ― Patrick Rothfuss

65) “The road to enlightenment is long and difficult, and you should try not to forget snacks and magazines.” ― Anne Lamott

66) “Those who travel to mountain-tops are half in love with themselves, and half in love with oblivion.” ― Robert Macfarlane

67) “You can’t control the past, but you can control where you go next.” ― Kirsten Hubbard

68) “You told me once of the plants that lie dormant through the drought, that wait, half-dead, deep in the earth. The plants that wait for the rain. You said they’d wait for years, if they had to; that they’d almost kill themselves before they grew again. But as soon as those first drops of a waterfall, those plants begin to stretch and spread their roots. They travel up through the soil and sand to reach the surface.” ― Lucy Christopher

69) “Most people fail at whatever they attempt because of an undecided heart. Should I? Should I not? Go forward? Go back? Success requires the emotional balance of a committed heart. When confronted with a challenge, the committed heart will search for a solution. The undecided heart searches for an escape. A committed heart does not wait for conditions to be exactly right. Why? Because conditions are never exactly right.” ― Andy Andrews

70) “Everything will be alright in the end so if it is not alright it is not the end.” ― Deborah Moggach

71) “The wish to travel seems to me characteristically human: the desire to move, to satisfy your curiosity or ease your fears, to change the circumstances of your life, to be a stranger, to make a friend, to experience an exotic landscape, to risk the unknown.” ― Paul Theroux

72) “By hook or by crook, I hope that you will possess yourselves of money enough to travel and to idle, to contemplate the future or the past of the world, to dream over books and loiter at street corners and let the line of thought dip deep into the stream.” ― Virginia Woolf

73) “When we fully understand the brevity of life, its fleeting joys, and unavoidable pains; when we accept the facts that all men and women are approaching an inevitable doom: the consciousness of it should make us more kindly and considerate of each other. This feeling should make men and women use their best efforts to help their fellow travelers on the road, to make the path brighter and easier as we journey on. It should bring a closer kinship, a better understanding, and a deeper sympathy for the wayfarers who must live a common life and die a common death.” ― Clarence Darrow

74) “I want my life to be the greatest story. My very existence will be the greatest poem. Watch me burn.” ― Charlotte Eriksson

75) “Along your pathway of life you will observe that you are not the only traveler. There are others who need your help. There are feet to steady, hands to grasp, minds to encourage, hearts to inspire, and souls to save.” ― Thomas S. Monson

76) “To wander is to be alive.” ― Roman Payne

77) “Travel light, live light, spread the light, be the light.” ― Yogi Bhajan

78) “Every day is a journey, and the journey itself is home.” ― Bashō Matsuo

79) “It is better to travel aimlessly than to sit idle and daydream about a perfect vacation.” ― Salil Jha

80) “One day in my shoes and a day for me in your shoes, the beauty of travel lies in the ease and willingness to be more open.” ― Forrest Curran

81) “When you travel, you are with yourself. You can’t carry your belongings, your home, your past. Long-term travel is a form of meditation and a life of simplicity.” – Salil Jha

82) “If you want to be a minimalist – travel.” – Salil Jha

83) “With maps and globes decorated around your room as a child and with passport and ticket in hand in the present, it is your world to explore. To travel is to ask for a complex mix of the new and the old, hellos and goodbyes, and sadness and happiness. Leave your shoes behind at home and to walk in the footsteps of others for a while.” ― Forrest Curran

84) “Sure, the Leaning Tower of Pisa leaned like everyone else said it would, the mountains of Tibet were more beautiful than you had ever expected, and the Pyramids of Egypt stood mysteriously in the sea of sand like in the pictures; yet is it the environment or rather the openness in mindset, that makes up the elusive essence of happiness that we experience when we travel?” ― Forrest Curran

Photo: The Art of Travel Partners

85) “Is the sunrise of Mount Fuji more beautiful from the one you see in the countryside a bit closer to home? Are the beaches of Indonesia really that much more serene than those we have in our own countries? The point I make is not to downplay the marvels of the world, but to highlight the notion of the human tendency in our failure to see the beauty in our daily lives when we take off the travel goggles when we are home. It is the preconceived notion of a place that creates the difference in perception of environments rather than the actual geological location.” ― Forrest Curran

86) “The beauty of traveling is understood along the way rather than at the end of the journey, just as the purpose of marriage isn’t about becoming Mr. and Mrs.’s, but is about the love that is expressed on a daily basis between two lovers. A journey is not made up of the destinations that we arrive at, but is composed with every step we take.” ― Forrest Curran

87) “It is enough to think that we are mortals and that today may be our last. Live to the fullest while you are alive. Explore, try, travel.” – Salil Jha

88) “I have loved and been loved; I have been given much and I have given something in return; I have read and traveled and thought and written. I have had an intercourse with the world. Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and adventure.” ― Oliver Sacks

89) “It is better to travel, than to arrive.” ― Gautama Buddha

90) “I am not going to seek employment again, that is for certain. To live a short life and being told what to do, when to do, and how to do is not a safe life but an absurd life. Quitting servitude is the first step towards freedom and a chance for achieving an extraordinary life.” – Salil Jha

91) “Wandering is the activity of the child, the passion of the genius; it is the discovery of the self, the discovery of the outside world, and the learning of how the self is both “at one with” and “separate from” the outside world. These discoveries are as fundamental to the soul as “learning to survive” is fundamental to the body. These discoveries are essential to realizing what it means to be human. To wander is to be alive.” ― Roman Payne

92) “Just as a painter paints, and a ponderer ponders, a writer writes, and a wanderer wanders.” ― Roman Payne

93) “When I die, I want your hands on my eyes. I want the light and heat of your beloved hands to pass their freshness over me. Once more I want to feel the softness that changed my destiny. I want you to live while I wait for you, asleep. I want your ears still to hear the wind; I want you to sniff the sea’s aroma that we loved together, to continue to walk on the sand we walk on. I want what I love to continue to live, and you whom I love and sang above everything else to continue to flourish, full-flowered. So that you can reach everything my love directs you to. So that my shadow can travel along in your hair, so that everything can learn the reason for my song.” ― Pablo Neruda

94) “God always brings someone into your life that has traveled the same path and knows the rocks you climbed to get to the end of the trail.” ― Shannon L. Alder

95) “To travel a circle is to journey over the same ground time and time again. To travel a circle wisely is to journey over the same ground for the first time. In this way, the ordinary becomes extraordinary, and the circle, a path to where you wish to be. And when you notice at last that the path has circled back into itself, you realize that where you wish to be is where you have already been … and always were.” ― Neale Donald Walsch

96) “The overdressed traveler betrays more interest in being seen than in seeing, while the true traveler knows that the novel world about her serves as the most appropriate accessory.” ― Gregory Maguire

97) “Whenever you go on a trip to visit foreign lands or distant places, remember that they are all someone’s home and backyard.” ― Vera Nazarian

98) “If you can’t travel, read. Reading is like travel, allowing you to exit your own life for a bit, and to come back with a renewed, even inspired, perspective.” ― Laurie A. Helgoe

99) “Every perfect traveler always creates the country where he travels.” ― Nikos Kazantzakis

100) “It’s hard to go. It’s scary and lonely…and half the time you’ll be wondering why the hell you’re in Cincinnati or Austin or North Dakota or Mongolia or wherever your melodious little finger-plucking heinie takes you. There will be boondoggles and discombobulated days, freaked-out nights and metaphorical flat tires. But it will be soul-smashingly beautiful… It will open up your life.” ― Cheryl Strayed

Photo: The Art of Travel Partners

Also Read: 100+ Common Travel Questions Answered

101) “The explorer who will not come back or send back his ships to tell his tale is not an explorer, only an adventurer; and his sons are born in exile.” ― Ursula K. Le Guin

102) “Bad, or good, as it happens to be, that is what it is to exist! To sail into an unknown spring, or receive one’s baptism on storm’s promontory, where the solitary albatross heels over in the gale, and at last come to land. To know the earth under one’s foot and go, in wild delight, ways where there is water.” ― Malcolm Lowry

103) “Real travel would be to see the world, for even an instant, with another’s eyes.” ― Robyn Davidson

104) “Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, but I chose neither one. Instead, I set sail in my little boat to watch a sunset from a different view that couldn’t be seen from shore. Then I climbed the tallest mountain peak to watch the amber sun through the clouds. Finally, I traveled to the darkest part of the valley to see the last glimmering rays of light through the misty fog. It was every perspective I experienced on my journey that left the leaves trodden black, and that has made all the difference.” ― Shannon L. Alder

105) “This is what you should know about losing someone you love. They do not travel alone. You go with them.” ― Augusten Burroughs

106) “Let’s not just grow roots but also wings to fly.” ― Salil Jha

107) “I had always believed that I left a bit of me wherever I went. I also believed that I took a bit of every place with me. It was as if the act of touching these places, walking these roads, and asking these questions had added another column to my being. And the only possible explanation I could find for that feeling was that a spirit existed in many of the places I visited, and a spirit existed in me and the two had somehow met in the course of my travels. It’s as if the godliness of the land and the godliness of my being had fused.” ― Bruce Feiler

108) “Find something you love and go for it with all your heart. No excuses, no plan B. Never settle for anything less than you know you can do. It will be hard, but I promise it will be worth it.” ― Charlotte Eriksson

109) “Wanderlust is a form of curiosity. It is naturally human. You cannot keep it buried and expect it to never arise.” ― Salil Jha

110) “Sometimes, in a summer morning, having taken my accustomed bath, I sat in my sunny doorway from sunrise till noon, rapt in a revery, amidst the pines and hickories and sumachs, in undisturbed solitude and stillness, while the birds sing around or flitted noiseless through the house, until by the sun falling in at my west window, or the noise of some traveller’s wagon on the distant highway, I was reminded of the lapse of time. I grew in those seasons like corn in the night, and they were far better than any work of the hands would have been. They were not time subtracted from my life, but so much over and above my usual allowance. I realized what the Orientals mean by contemplation and the forsaking of works. For the most part, I minded not how the hours went. The day advanced as if to light some work of mine; it was morning, and lo, now it is evening, and nothing memorable is accomplished.” ― Henry David Thoreau

111) “One goes on a vacation to relax but one travels to satiate inquisitiveness.” ― Salil Jha

112) “Most of our life is encountering the expected, the normal; it is the encounter with the unexpected that teaches us the truth.” ― Salil Jha

113) “Roam abroad in the world, and take thy fill of its enjoyments before the day shall come when thou must quit it for good.” ― Saadi

114) “Goals are my north star. My compass. The map that guides me along the road I wish to travel. Goals are motivations with wind in their sails—they carry me forward despite the storms.” ― Richelle E. Goodrich

115) “Just as we are never too young for love, we are never too old to travel.” ― Salil Jha

116) “There is psychological pleasure in this takeoff, too, for the swiftness of the plane’s ascent is an exemplary symbol of transformation. The display of power can inspire us to imagine analogous, decisive shifts in our own lives, to imagine that we, too, might one day surge above much that now looms over us.” ― Alain de Botton

117) “I see my path, but I don’t know where it leads. Not knowing where I am going is what inspires me to travel it.” ― Rosalía de Castro

118) “But real life doesn’t travel in a perfect straight line; it doesn’t necessarily have that ‘all lived happily ever after’ bit. You have to work on where you’re going.” ― Chris Kyle

119) “No man is brave that has never walked a hundred miles. If you want to know the truth of who you are, walk until not a person knows your name. Travel is the great leveler, the great teacher, bitter as medicine, crueler than mirror-glass. A long stretch of road will teach you more about yourself than a hundred years of quiet introspection.” ― Patrick Rothfuss

120) “I have a terrible wanderthirst; the very sight of a map makes me want to put on my hat and take an umbrella and start. I shall see before I die the palms and temples of the South.” ― Jean Webster

Photo: The Art of Travel Partners

121) “Meditation is an essential travel partner on your journey of personal transformation. Meditation connects you with your soul, and this connection gives you access to your intuition, your heartfelt desires, your integrity, and the inspiration to create a life you love.” ― Sarah McLean

122) “The only cure to all this madness; is too dream, far and wide, if possibility doesn’t knock, create a damn door. If the shoe doesn’t fit, don’t make it. If the journey you’re travelling seems to farfetched and wild beyond your imagination; continue on it, great things come to the risk takers. And last but not least, live today; here, right now, you’ll thank your future self for it later.” ― Nikki Rowe

123) “Cutting my roots and leaving my home and family when I was 18 years old forced me to build my home in other things, like my music, stories and my journey. The last years I have more or less constantly been on my way, on the road, always leaving and never arriving, which also means leaving people. I’ve loved and lost and I have regrets and I miss and no matter how many times you leave, start over, achieve success or travel places it’s other people that matter. People, friends, family, lovers, strangers – they will forever stay with you, even if only through memory. I’ve grown to appreciate people to the deepest core and I’m trying to learn how to tell people what I want to tell them when I have the chance, before it’s too late.” ― Charlotte Eriksson

124) “A wanderer may be far from home but is never lost.” ― Salil Jha

125) “Your comfort zone is a place where you keep yourself in a self-illusion and nothing can grow there but your potentiality can grow only when you can think and grow out of that zone.” ― Rashedur Ryan Rahman

126) “The world is full of wonderful things you haven’t seen yet. Don’t ever give up on the chance of seeing them.” ― J.K. Rowling

127)  “Life is whatever we make it. The traveler is the journey. What we see is not what we see but who we are.” ― Fernando Pessoa

128) “When you take the step towards your dreams you will be met with fears because you have never traveled this way before. As you go, you will discover that you had nothing to fear. Through overcoming your fears you give those that follow you hope that if they pursue their dreams, they will achieve their dreams.” ― E’yen A. Gardner

129) “Going on a journey doesn’t mean believing in a path, but having faith in yourself.” ― Salil Jha

130) “This wasn’t a strange place; it was a new one.” ― Paolo Coehlo

131)  “I always wonder why birds stay in the same place when they can fly anywhere on the earth. Then I ask myself the same question.” ― Harun Yahya

132) “We are torn between the nostalgia for the familiar and an urge for the foreign and strange. As often as not, we are homesick most for the places we have never known.” ― Carson McCullers

133) “I no longer see any meaning of life but then I saw no reason to die as well. I traveled to faraway lands, running away from friends, family and everyone else and I confined myself to my thoughts, to my feelings and to myself. Hours, days, weeks and months passed and I waited for a moment of magic to happen, a turn of destiny, but nothing happened, nothing ever happens. I waited and I counted each moment of it, thinking about every moment of my life, the good and the bad ones. I then saw how powerful yet weak, bright yet dark, beautiful yet ugly, joyous yet grievous; is a one single moment. One moment makes the difference. Just one moment. Such appears to be the extreme and undisputed power of a single moment. I realized that the power of the moment is not in the moment itself. The power, actually, is in us. Every single one of us has the power to make and shape our own moments. It is us who by feeling joyful, celebrate for a moment of success; and it is also us who by feeling saddened, cry and mourn over our losses. I, with all my heart and mind, now embrace this power which lies within us. I wish life offers you more time to make use of this power. Remember, we are our own griefs, we are our own happiness, and we are our own remedies.” ― Huseyn Raza

134) “It’s hard to be less than happy when you can be happy with less.” ― Chris Brady

135) “Why the obsession with worldly possessions? When it’s your time to go, they have to stay behind, so pack light.” ― Alex Morritt

136) “There is no place like the beach… where the land meets the sea and the sea meats the sky.” ― Umair Siddiqui

137) “In the old days, when travelers would get lost, they would follow the stars and I love that idea. I wish that I could rely on something as simple and magnificent as a star for all of my aching questions.” ― Jennifer Elisabeth

138) “He will one day meet his true love… A fellow traveler on the road… Her eyes will be his ocean… In her ocean he will sail forever.” ― Kem

139) “The spectacular landscape circling the fortress supplies an essential backdrop, inspiring dreamers to wander its ruins for the sake of it; North American tourists, bound down by their practical world view, are able to place those members of the disintegrating tribes they may have seen in their travels among these once-living walls, unaware of the moral distance separating them, since only the semi-indigenous spirit of the South American can grasp the subtle differences.” ― Ernesto Che Guevara

Photo: The Art of Travel Partners

140) “Having books standing on a shelf in a room is like having completely different worlds at the ready, waiting to be explored.” ― J.F Hermann

141) “Freedom has its dangers as well as its joys. And the sooner we learn to get up after a fall, the better off we’ll be.” ― Alice Steinbach

142) “I am thankful to all the souls, I meet in the journey of life.” ― Lailah Gifty Akita

143) “But it is a long and difficult road, full of perils, and if a traveler on foot were to look at the length of it, his spirit would be overcome and he would sit down and refuse to go any further. You must not look to the end of the road. Look only to the step in front of you. That you can do. Just one step. And you will not make the journey alone.” ― Deanna Raybourn

144) “All travel is circular. I had been jerked through Asia, making a parabola on one of the planet’s hemispheres. After all, the grand tour is just the inspired man’s way of heading home. ” ― Paul Theroux

145) “The best traveler is one without a camera.” ― Kamand Kojouri

146) “Carrying a camera doesn’t make one a lesser traveler, but looking at a place only through your camera lens does.” ― Salil Jha

147) “All men have the stars but they are not the same things for different people. For some, who are travelers, the stars are guides. For others they are no more than little lights in the sky. But all the stars are silent. You, you alone, will have the stars as no one else has them.” ― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

148) “I believe that life is all about perception and timing. That good things come to those who act and that life’s about more than collecting a paycheck. I believe that the only person you’re destined to become is the one that you decide to be. That if you try hard enough you can convince yourself of anything. That having patience doesn’t make you a hero nor does it make you a doormat. I believe that not showing love proves you’re weak and belittling others doesn’t make you strong. That you are never as far away from people as the miles may suggest.” ― Todd Smidt

149) “Life’s too short to read awful books, listen to terrible music, or be around uninspiring people. I believe that where you start has little impact on where you finish. That sometimes the best thing you can do is walk away. I believe that the cure for anything is salt water; sweat, tears, or the sea. That you should never let your memories be greater than your dreams. And that you should always choose adventure.” ― Todd Smidt

150) “That we leave our homes, that we step through our doors to the world, that we travel our whole lives not because we want to collect exotic T-shirts, not because we want to consume foreign adventure the same Western way we consume plastic and Styrofoam and LCD TVs and iPads, but because it has the power to renew us—not the guarantee, not the promise, just the possibility. Because there are places our imaginations can never construct for us, and there are people who we will never meet but we could and we might. It reminds us that there is always reason to begin again.” ― Stephen Markley

151) “Every journey has its own traveler. Every dream has its own dreamer. We are all belonged to a specific journey and dream. Some people are currently looking for it, some people are just figuring it out, some people are still lost, and to some they have finally found it.” ― Diana Rose Morcilla

152) “If there is anything I have learned in my travels across the Planes, it is that many things may change the nature of a man. Whether regret, or love, or revenge or fear ― whatever you believe can change the nature of a man, can. I’ve seen belief move cities, make men stave off death, and turn an evil hag’s heart half-circle.” ― Chris Avellone

153) “Travel is the discovery of truth; an affirmation of the promise that human kind is far more beautiful than it is flawed. With each trip comes a new optimism that where there is despair and hardship, there are ideas and people just waiting to be energized, to be empowered, to make a difference for good.” ― Dan Thompson

154) “Leave no path untaken.” ― Neil Gaiman

155) “We did all the tourist crap, but I just wanted to sit in a cafe and watch people.” ― Sara Shepard

156) “Do not ask me where I am going, as I travel in this infinite world, where every step I take is my home.” ― Dōgen

157) “When you build a city near no mountains and no ocean, you get materialism and traditionalist religions. People have too much time and lack inspiration.” ― Donald Miller

158) “As a traveler, education is our way of life.” ― Debasish Mridha

159) “Go far—too far you cannot, still the farther. And go sparing — one meal a week will serve you, and one suit, through all your travels.” ― John Fletcher

160) “Know most of the rooms of thy native country before thou goest over the threshold thereof.” ― Thomas Fuller

Photo: The Art of Travel Partners

161) “(Un viaggiatore prudente non disprezza mai il suo paese.) A wise traveler never despises his own country.” ― Carlo Goldoni

162) “The soul of the journey is liberty, perfect liberty, to think, feel, do just as one pleases.” ― William Hazlitt

163) “The use of travelling is to regulate imagination by reality, and instead of thinking how things may be, to see them as they are.” ― Samuel Johnson

164) “Let him go abroad to a distant country; let him go to some place where he is not known. Don’t let him go to the devil where he is known.” ― Samuel Johnson

165) “As the Spanish proverb says, “He who would bring home the wealth of the Indies must carry the wealth of the Indies with him.” So it is in travelling: a man must carry knowledge with him, if he would bring home knowledge.” ― Samuel Johnson

166) “Though they carry nothing forth with them, yet in all their journey they lack nothing. For wheresoever they go, they are at home.” ― Sir Thomas More

167) “Why do you wonder that globetrotting does not help you, seeing that you always take yourself with you? The reason which set you wandering is ever at your heels.” ― Socrates

168) “When I was at home, I was in a better place; but travelers must be content.” ― William Shakespeare

169) “The sundry contemplation of my travels, in which my often rumination wraps me in a most humorous sadness.” ― William Shakespeare

170) “To travel hopefully is better than to arrive.” ― Robert Louis Stevenson

171) “I always love to begin a journey on Sundays, because I shall have the prayers of the church to preserve all that travel by land or by water.” ― Jonathan Swift

172) “A rolling stone gathers no moss.” ― Publius Syrus

173) “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.” ― Mark Twain

174) “Good company in a journey makes the way to seem the shorter.” ― Izaak Walton

175) “The person attempting to travel two roads at once will get nowhere.” ― Xun Zi

176) “The traveled mind is the catholic mind educated from exclusiveness and egotism.” ― Amos Bronson Alcott

177) “Traveling is no fool’s errand to him who carries his eyes and itinerary along with him.” ― Amos Bronson Alcott

178) “Travel, in the younger sort, is a part of education; in the elder, a part of experience. He that travels into a country before he has some entrance into the language goes to school, and not to travel.” ― Francis Bacon

179) “He travels safest in the darkness of night who travels lightest.” ― Fernando Cortez

180) “One who journeying along a way he knows not, having crossed a place of drear extent, before him sees a river rushing swiftly toward the deep, and all its tossing current white with foam, and stops and turns, and measures back his way.” ― Homer

181) “They change their sky, not their mind, who cross the sea. A busy idleness possesses us: we seek a happy life, with ships and carriages: the object of our search is present with us.” ― Horace

182) “I am fevered with the sunset, I am fretful with the bay, for the wander-thirst is on me and my soul is in Cathay.” ― Richard Hovey

183) “The wonders of each region view, from frozen Lapland to Peru.” ― Soame Jenkyns

184) “The use of travelling is to regulate imagination by reality, and, instead of thinking how things may be, to see them as they are.” ― Samuel Johnson

185) “Let observation with extensive view, survey mankind from China to Peru; remark each anxious toil, each eager strife, and watch the busy scenes of crowded life.” ― Samuel Johnson

186) “Follow the Romany pattern sheer to the Austral light, where the bosom of God is the wild-west wind, sweeping the sea floors white.” ― Rudyard Kipling

187) “Death is the final journey we all must take. Don’t wait to travel on your own until your final voyage.” ― Salil Jha

Photo: The Art of Travel Partners

188) “The secret to meditation is to drop the mind. The secret to long-term travel is to drop your plans.” ― Salil Jha

189) “Traveling is living a book that is in the process of being written.” ― Salil Jha

190) “Better sit still where born, I say, wed one sweet woman and love her well, love and be loved in the old East way, drink sweet waters, and dream in a spell than to wander in search of the Blessed Isles, and to sail the thousands of watery miles in search of love, and find you at last on the edge of the world, and a curs’d outcast.” ― Joaquin Miller

191) “The dust is old upon my sandal, and I am still a pilgrim; I have moved from wild America to Bosphor’s waters, and worshipped at innumerable shrines of beauty; and the painter’s art. To me, and sculpture, speak as with a living tongue, and of dead kingdoms, I recall the soul, sitting amid their ruins.” ― Nathaniel Parker Willis

192) “To love, you don’t wait until the wedding. To travel, you don’t wait until you retire. Just as you fall in love, you let yourself to be seduced by wanderlust.” ― Salil Jha

193) “(Qui veut voyager loin ménage sa monture.) He who will travel far spares his steed.” ― Jean Racine

194) “Does the road wind uphill all the way? Will the day’s journey take the whole long day?” ― Christina G. Rossetti

195) “Does the pilgrim counts the miles when he travels to some distant shrine?” ― Friedrich Schiller

196) “He whose mind is everywhere is nowhere.” ― Seneca the Younger

197) “I think it was Jekyll who used to say that the further he went west, the more convinced he felt that the wise men came from the east.” ― Sydney Smith

198) “I pity the man who can travel from Dan to Beersheba and cry, “‘Tis all barren!” ― Laurence Sterne

199) “When we have discovered a continent, or crossed a chain of mountains, it is only to find another ocean or another plain upon the further side…. O toiling hands of mortals! O wearied feet, travelling ye know not whither! Soon, soon, it seems to you, you must come forth on some conspicuous hilltop, and but a little way further, against the setting sun, descry the spires of El Dorado. Little do ye know your own blessedness; for to travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive, and the true success is to labor.” ― Robert Louis Stevenson

200) “Many travel the world to seek meaning. In sadness, many travel to seek happiness. But no such place exists in this mad world. Each of us carries the fountain of joy within us and the meaning of travel is to witness the conscious expression of life.” ― Salil Jha

201) “For always roaming with a hungry heart, much have I seen and known.” ― Alfred Tennyson

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It’s the beginning of summer, which means it’s time to start planning a fun road trip. If you’re in Utahyou’re in luck! The Mighty Five National Parks (Arches, Zion, Bryce Canyon, Canyonlands, and Capitol Reef) are within a half-day’s drive of Salt Lake City.

If you feel like a long road trip, you can visit Yellowstone National Park, Grand Canyon National Park, or Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.

Must Vist Destinations On Your Utah Road Trip

I first moved to Utah two years ago, and have visited all of the national parks here. Here’s what I’ve learned from my road trips that are a must-see if you’re driving through Utah this summer. 

If you’re leaving from Salt Lake City, expect to arrive at any of these spots within about 5 hours.

Related: 7 Best Places Not Enough People Visit In America

Zion National Park

Zion is Utah’s first ever National Park, and has over 4 million visitors every year. By far Utah’s most popular national park, this place is a must-see destination. It gets crowded, so make sure to plan ahead and arrive early. My favorite adventure was a hike through the Narrows!

If you are looking for a more challenging and hike with beautiful views you will not go wrong with Angels Landing. You can spend anywhere from a few hours to a few days in Zion.

Just remember: you must use shuttles to get through the park, it’s best to arrive early, and bring plenty of water.

Pro tip: The city of Hurricane is only 30 minutes from the entrance to Zion National Park, and is a much more cost-effective option than staying in or near the park.

Related: US National Parks

Bryce Canyon National Park

This is truly one of Utah’s most underrated parks with some of the most unique rock formations in the world. Bryce Canyon National Park has over 2 million visitors per year. There are shuttles available or you can drive your own car through the park.

Pro tip: There isn’t a whole lot of trails in Bryce Canyon National Park. Much of the park can be seen by parking and a viewpoint.

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

This National Monument is the size of Delaware, and features many unique rock formations throughout.  It’s also one of the most remote and infrequently visited travel destinations in Utah. You can even find some of Utah’s famous slot canyons here.

Image Credit

Pro tip: Find the Visitor’s Center and talk to a ranger. Plan out your visit because this park is huge, remote, and fairly empty. Make sure you know where you’re going before entering the park.

Arches National Park

Last, but not least – Arches National Park. This is arguably Utah’s most famous national park. Delicate Arch is one of Utah’s most famous rock formations, and is featured on across tourism campaigns everywhere. It’s worth the hike to see this amazing rock.

Pro tip: Be sure to leave early in the day, as it gets hot and crowded pretty quickly. Wear good shoes, bring a hat, and bring more water than you’ll think you need.

I really can’t stress how much there is to see in Utah. Salt Lake City itself is full of great hikes, nightlife, and fun events. If you have time, be sure to check out a list of hikes and sights to see in downtown Salt Lake and Park City.

Utah boasts some of the United State’s best and most unique National Parks, and they’re all accessible by car. If you’re planning a trip to Utah, be sure get in your car and explore the state’s unique rocks and deserts.

Related: 9 Tips on How to Have a Great Holiday in America

Author Bio

Victoria Schmid is a freelance writer with a background in television and digital journalism. She enjoys writing articles about smart technology that will educate and inspire readers. She has a passion for news, writing, and reading. In her free time, she loves hiking, traveling, exploring, and volunteering.

Hiking In Malta: 5 Things You Need To Know

South of Italy, in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, sits a tiny island holding one of the most diverse landscapes in all of Europe.

The island country of Malta is one of the most unique places to hike in all of Europe and affordable flights to the island come from almost every country in Europe.

A vast clear sea full of life underneath, top-tier sand beaches, towering coastal cliffs, breathtaking cityscapes, and great hills filled with vibrant agricultural sights and local culture.

Hiking In Malta

Related: Top 6 Places to Visit in Malta

I’ve lived in Malta for two years and have hiked just about every trail and coastline on the island. Without further ado, here are 5 things you need to know about hiking in Malta.

1. Some of the best hiking can be done on the west coast of the island

The west coast of Malta is my favorite on the island. You’ll notice life is slow to the West and the famous stretch of towering cliffs known as Dingli Cliffs is no different. Head out for an evening hike and majestic Maltese sunset viewing for maximizing the potential of the west coast.

2. Hike across the entire island in a weekend

That’s right – the island is so small, you could walk its entirety in a weekend. I’ve done it before and love to tell the story of when I hiked across an entire country! Wild camping is not only allowed on the island but its the only camping option.

Bring a tent and set up camp wherever you end up for a night and continue your cross-country hike in the morning. My hike along the entire west coast was around 54 kilometers in total.

3. Hike around the entire sister island of Comino in a matter of hours

The island is relatively unexplored by the rest of the world and that makes it one of the best places to hike in solitude. With only one local inhabitant on the island, you’ll rarely run into another soul – especially after all the tourist day-trippers go home.

See some awe-inspiring cliffs, crystal clear water, and, of course, the world-renown Blue Lagoon that makes the island a popular spot for all tourists.

4. See the best hiking on the island of Gozo

Gozo, just a short ferry ride from the northernmost part of Malta is the largest sister island of Malta’s archipelago.

With only a small percentage of the population, Malta has, its calm environment could very well be the best place to get a full taste of Maltese culture. Not to mention its great cliffs, flashy colors, and relaxing beaches – there aren’t many better combinations that will make as great.

5. Trails are fairly unmaintained and wild

Sometimes, the trail you are following will end and it could get confusing – especially if you’re not following the coastline. Malta is a beautiful place with lovely local people who are willing to show you around. Don’t be afraid to ask a local for directions and you never know what experience may come of it.

Malta and its vast landscapes are one of the best-kept secrets in Europe and its Mediterranean culture is sure to keep you coming back to the island for more. Good thing there’s plenty of hikes to go on upon each return.

Author Bio

Adam Cheshier is an adventure travel novelist writing fiction tales based on his travels around the world for the past three years. Check out his top travel tales on his storytelling blog or follow along through his Instagram.

5 Exceptionally Romantic Getaways in South India

There are many destinations all around the world that have marvelous wonders to win your heart. India is one of such place where the natural beauty and cultural influence can make people fall in love all over again.

There are many historic monuments as well as the natural beauty that attracts many travelers from all around the world. India is a huge country with diverse culture and landscape.

A traditional South Indian home lunch on a banana leaf

If you are looking for a romantic getaway there are some exceptionally romantic destination in the Southern part of the country.

Romantic Getaways in South India

South India is also called the romantic hub as it has gorgeous hill stations, beaches,  and natural heritage. It is also a great place to visit on a honeymoon.

The states of Tamil Nadu, Goa, Kerala, and Karnataka take their tourism very seriously and make sure that the tourists have a good time. Here are some of the most  romantic spots in the southern part of India which is worth a visit.

Related: 10 Best Summer Places To Visit In India

Munnar

Photo: Munnar tea plantations/ CC Rajib Ghosh

Munnar is a place that comes on any list of best honeymoon destination in south India. The tea gardens, lakes, waterfalls, and beautiful countryside can make your romantic getaway unforgettable.

Munnar also has a rich natural heritage. This place is a complete relax zone for people who want to take a break from the busy city life.

Coorg

Coorg is another hill station situated in the beautiful state of Karnataka. Considering the fact that Coorg is only 260 km from the city of Banglore, the beauty of Coorg is unparallel.

The morning time on this hill station truly makes the couples enthrall with bliss. The mix of white fog and green landscapes makes Coorg a beautiful and ideal romantic spot for couples.

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Marina Beach

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This long 12km beach in Chennai is one of the longest urban beaches in the world. The sunset and sunrise at the beach is what attracts couples where they can witness the true beauty of the sun.

Take a stroll down the beach and make memories. This can surely influence your relationship in the best way possible.

Related: 25 Beautiful Couple Travel Quotes

Mudumalai National Park

This is a stunning spot for romantic couples who are looking for a walk in the wild. The Mudumalai National Park is known for its rich vegetation and unique biodiversity.

The Mudumalai National Park is spread across 6000 square kilometers protecting many endangered wildlife species. This is the best place for newlywed couples looking for an adventure for their honeymoon.

Kodaikanal

Kodaikanal is a beautiful hill station located in the state of Tamil Nadu. Kodaikanal is also known as the princess of hill stations throughout the country.

It is also regarded as one of the famous romantic spots for a honeymoon in the state of Tamil Nadu. There are many enchanting viewpoints and lakes filled with water lilies that give the couples an opportunity to cherish their relationship.

Related: 5 Tips For First-Time Visitors To India

The romantic trip to South India is the dream of many couples and honestly, it is worth a visit. There are many South India Tour Packages available from many online platforms such as Tamil Nadu routes.

If you are planning a trip to south India then makes sure to pack properly and prepare yourself for a treat.

Read Next: Visit the 36 UNESCO Heritage Sites in India

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Author Bio

Charles A. Jacobs has visited several places in the world including the 7 wonders of the world and is still looking for a place where he might end his journey. He is a travel enthusiast and owner of the TamilNadu Routes.

15 Places To Go For The Best Northern Lights Experience

The Northern Lights or Aurora Borealis is a phenomenon that can be seen with the naked eye from late-August to mid-April when the sky turns dark around 6 PM to 6 AM. The colorful light display is highly visible in the Auroral Zone, which is between latitude 65 degrees and latitude 72 degrees.

Parts of Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Iceland, the British Isles, the Scandinavian Peninsula, and Russia are the best places to experience the Aurora Borealis.

Experiencing the dance of Northen Lights

Best Northern Lights View

In this post, we will provide you with the list of 15 best places from where you can experience one of the most sought-after bucket list worthy destinations to view the Northern Lights. Auroral displays can appear in many colors although as you’ll notice, pale green and light pink are the most common. Shades of red, yellow, blue, and violet can also be in the mix.

Fairbanks, Alaska

As the largest city in the interior region of Alaska, the city lights may distract you so you may want to go farther into the northeast to Chena Resort from where you can view the Aurora while relaxing in a hot spring. You do not need to be observant at all times because they provide an Aurora alarm service which alerts guests when the light show starts.

As seen from Beaver Creek Scenic River in Alaska

Murmansk, Russia

Located above the Arctic Circle in northwest Russia, be prepared because temperatures can drop to as low as -40 degrees Celsius in the Russian winter. This season also brings polar nights where the sun is constantly below the horizon. During this period, the sky will be completely dark, increasing your chances of viewing the Northern Lights.

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Yellowknife, Canada

Located in the northwest of Canada, Yellowknife is just 250 miles from the Arctic Circle. A half-hour drive will bring you to Aurora Village, a teepee campground where you can view the Northern Lights from the comfort of warm and cozy viewing chairs.

As seen in Yellowknife, Canada

Labrador, Canada

Found in the eastern part of Canada, the forbidding terrain and extreme climate keep the region pristine. The top of the ski trail at the Birch Brook Nordic Ski Club, located near central Labrador, will provide you with a view of the Northern Lights reflecting on vast snow-covered trails.

Yukon, Canada

You do not need to be on land to be able to view the Northern Lights. The partnership between Tourism Yukon, Air North, and the Yukon Astronomical Society now offers flights from Whitehorse, Yukon that specifically flies over the Auroral zone to allow viewers to see the Aurora from the air. You can now enjoy the beautiful northern lights from 36,000 feet above the Yukon.

As seen from Yukon Territory, Canada

Abisko National Park, Sweden

Surrounding mountains and prevailing winds create an atmospheric effect that clears the sky over this region found on the center of the Swedish Lapland. The cloudless winter night creates an excellent viewing condition of the sky along with the view of the mountains and alpine meadows.

Tromso, Norway

Located above the Arctic Circle, this city in northern Norway is a famous site for viewing the Northern Lights. You can make the viewing more special by boarding the Hurtigruten, the Norwegian coastal steamer, so you can view the Aurora in a fjord. Don’t worry if you fall asleep, the ship provides wake up calls when the Aurora is visible.

As seen from Norway

Svalbard, Norway

A remote archipelago located north of Norway known for glaciers and frozen tundra, the islands here have long, dark, cloudless nights with dry weather – ideal conditions for viewing the Northern Lights. Although you will find more polar bears than people, there will be no shortage of attractions, from dog-sledding to backcountry skiing.

 

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Luosto, Finland

Santa’s Hotel Aurora glass igloos provide visitors with a different experience as they view not just the Northern Lights, but the whole arctic scenery from inside a Lapland hut-styled room with glass roof and walls. Here you can view the Aurora from the comfort of a fully equipped hotel room just a few steps from the reception and other services.

As seen in Finland

Oulanka National Park, Finland

Located in the Lapland regions of Finland, Oulanka National Park is one of the best places to go to see beautiful scenery backdropped by the Northern Lights. Comprised of pine forests and river valleys, you can find various camping areas from where you can view the Aurora.

Another shot of the dancing Aurora from Finland

Kangerlussuaq, Greenland

A region close to the Arctic Circle, this town in western Greenland is the main air transport hub so getting here will be easier than the other locations. Having clear skies 300 days a year also makes this a prime location for viewing the Northern Lights.

Thingvellir National Park, Iceland

The Northern Lights are visible from the whole of Iceland but you can improve the experience by viewing it from Thingvellir National Park, located in a rift valley that marks the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, which is a popular tourist destination because of its history and geology.

As seen from Iceland

Cairngorms National Park, Scotland

The largest national park in Britain, located in the Scottish Highlands, where you can perform daytime activities like skiing and hiking. Once night falls, one of the best places to view the Northern Lights is in Glenlivet Estate. Awarded a Dark Sky status, this location ensures that there are no artificial lights that prevent you from seeing the Aurora.

As seen in Scotland (Picture credit)

Isle of Skye, Scotland

The British Isles frequently have cloudy skies, but when the cloud cover breaks during the winter, the low light pollution paired with the breathtaking view of jagged mountain ranges, sea cliffs, pools, and moors makes for a beautiful scene backdropped by the Northern Lights.

On an Alaskan Crusie Ship

When you book a cruise ship going to Alaska during September, you would probably think that the highlight of the trip would be on one of the cruise shore excursions in the rugged outdoors, but you may be pleasantly surprised when the Northern Lights suddenly presents itself at sea.

Aurora Borealis

That’s it! These top 15 places offer unique perspective and view of the Northern Lights.

One tip in general: for those planning a visit to these areas, don’t make it a trip just for the Aurora Borealis because this phenomenon is elusive and you might be disappointed when you don’t see it. Clouds, weather, light pollution, time in hand, things that are not in your control can affect your viewing experience.

Having other activities planned will ensure that you will enjoy your trip whether you see the dancing Aurora Borealis or not.

Also, these aren’t the only places where you can view the Northern Lights. Sometimes, the Aurora presents itself in unexpected locations. So if you find yourself in the auroral zone in the evening, just face north, look up, and you just might get lucky.

Let us know in the comments below if you have experienced the mystical dance of the northern lights. What do you think? Please do share if you have any special moment or thought that came to you while viewing and experiencing the Aurora Borealis.

 

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Paradise Found at the Galapagos Islands

Let’s admit it, everyone dreams of laying at the white-sand beaches of Hawaii, Fiji, or Bora Bora. While these Islands are without a doubt charming, I have found my own paradise. The volcanic archipelago known as the Galapagos islands.

These beautiful islands can be found around 600 miles (1000 km) off the coast of Ecuador in the Pacific Ocean and are different from a stereotypical island with sandy beaches with palm and coconuts trees.

The Enchanted Islands

These islands are called the “Enchanted Islands” for good reason. Galapagos is full of life and mystery. There are hundreds of types of exotic animals that have made the variety of volcanic rocks, sand, and beaches their home. Charles Darwin famously wrote, “The natural history of these islands is eminently curious”.

Most of the Galapagos archipelago is uninhabited. The Galapagos were the first to be declared a World Heritage Site in 1978 and a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in 1984. The Galapagos National Park covers and protects almost 97% of the islands. As you can guess by now, this is your unspoiled paradise. 

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Galapagos Animals

There are so many islands in Galapagos, all with a different structure, vegetation, and wildlife. Whereas some islands are inhabited by land iguanas and waved albatrosses, others are full of penguins or seals. There is a good reason that the Galapagos islands became Darwin’s laboratory for the study of the origins of life.

The island’s landscape varies from rough volcanic rock to green overgrown areas with sandy beaches. This makes it an excellent destination to do more than just laying on the beach. You can hike, swim, snorkel, dive, mountain bike, kayak, and do so much more at this astonishing paradise.

There are white and red sand beaches that are full of seals, sea-lions, and other animals that you don’t get to see usually on most touristy islands. It is not uncommon that the curious animals accompany you on these trips.

These islands, isolated from human colonization have developed unique and abundant wildlife that has no natural fear of humans. Whereas in most other places, wild animals are often scared or are shy from humans, on here they are not afraid at all.

Galapagos Travel

Unfortunately, you often must choose between visiting the west or the eastern part of the Galapagos Islands. Luckily I found a tour operator in Quito that was able to make a tour that included everything I wanted! I loved the comfort of the cruise, alternated with the challenging hikes I did.

I never thought that I would be able to visit and live in my own “real-life nature and wildlife documentary’’, let alone take amazing pictures that make the journey even more memorable.

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Arriving at Galapagos Islands

The adventure starts when you arrive at the airport and make your way to the shore (and dock). You can hear the wind blowing and the loud barks of the seals and sea-lions, it’s like they all are welcoming you to this enchanted island.

The sun shines bright, but luckily since you are at the equator and it shines from straight above, it doesn’t block your view. Each following day you will be surprised. Just when you’ll think you know what to expect, there will be something unexpected coming your way that will surprise you.

Whichever islands or parts you explore, I think that Galapagos will never cease to amaze you.

Meeting new people

Whether you are a solo traveler, traveling with your special someone or friends, it’s always nice to meet new people and share our travel experiences.

I met some of the most amazing people in the Galapagos Islands, from world travelers to locals who have spent their lives on these beautiful Islands. Even they admitted that living there never gets boring or ordinary.

To my surprise most of the people spoke multiple languages, so making contact was very easy. We ate some fish at Alfonso’s house, a local we met that lives in Santa Cruz. Honestly, I was a little jealous of his seemingly relaxed and stress-free life in Galapagos.

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Protecting nature

I think that nature is very important and that it’s a shame that all the beautiful places on earth go under due to human greed and commercialization of tourism. Of all the places I’ve visited, I think the Ecuadorian government is setting an example of how to deal with preserving nature.

As noted above, almost 97% of the Galapagos Islands are part of the nature park, and this can be seen everywhere. According to Gulliver Expeditions, “It is obligated to be accompanied by a local guide and nature expert that is certified.’’ 

The guides here tell you awesome facts about the animals and wildlife while making sure that you stick to the rules. A lot of the money you pay for your Galapagos trip will be used to assure its existence in the future.

Galapagos vacation

I would recommend visiting the Galapagos Islands as this is one of the world’s most special places. Thinking about going on honeymoon to a truly unique romantic place? I think this is it.

Any beach, animal, or nature lover will absolutely fall in love with this virgin paradise that feels like nowhere else on earth. If you want to make sure your experience will be just as unforgettable as mine was, I would advise to check out a good tour operator and let them do what they do best, making your travel unique.

Guest blog contributed by our reader Mary Wilson.

 

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